joi, 24 martie 2016

Bentley Mark VI Estate Car by Rippon 1949 - World Of Classic Cars -

Bentley Mark VI Estate Car by Rippon 1949

In the tradition of the beautifully handcrafted shooting brakes produced for the hunting expeditions of landed gentry, the renowned English coachbuilders Rippon Brothers of Huddersfield continued producing luxury wood-bodied vehicles on Rolls-Royce and Bentley chassis until well into the 1950s. Among their creations were two built on the Bentley Mark VI chassis, among them this car, chassis number B91FU, delivered in May 1950 to Captain George H. Ackroyd, of the West Yorkshire carpet manufacturers T.F. Firth & Sons. The Rolls-Royce chassis cards for the car, copies of which are on file, note that the chassis was purchased by Rippon on behalf of Captain Ackroyd and was therefore a completely bespoke acquisition built to the captain’s order. A single side-mount was an unusual “throwback” Classic Era feature, while the sunroof was a rare feature on any “woodie.”
Bentley Mark VI Estate Car by Rippon 1949

In 1961, the car was purchased by R.H. Acheson Crow of Bristol, the last owner with whom the Rolls-Royce factory noted it. By the late 1980s, it had made its way to the United States in the ownership of Michael Clark, a Rolls-Royce Owners Club member. It was sold by Mr. Clark to well-known West Coast enthusiast Warren French and was then subsequently acquired by the renowned collector Henry Petronis of Easton, Maryland. While part of this august stable, it was cosmetically refinished by D.L. George Coachworks of Cochranville, Pennsylvania, well-known vintage Bentley specialists, with the woodwork restored by Easton resident Steve Hopkins, renowned for his work in wooden boat restoration!
Bentley Mark VI Estate Car by Rippon 1949

Mr. Petronis retained his bespoke Mark VI until 2010, when he sold it, along with the majority of his outstanding collection. Several years later, it was acquired by Mr. McCaw for his own renowned collection, in which it has been well maintained to a high standard, in typical fashion.
A recent inspection noted that the car retains its original engine, number B295F. While the paintwork is older and heavily patinated, the wood remains nicely varnished, presentable, and utterly authentic in appearance, and the interior is comfortably worn-in English leather, with excellent burled walnut trim.