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marți, 30 septembrie 2014

Mercedes-Benz 280 SL Roadster 1968 - World Of Classic Cars -

Mercedes-Benz 280 SL Roadster 1968

Contrary to popular belief, the W113 Mercedes-Benz SL introduced at the Geneva show in March 1963 was not a direct replacement for the outgoing 190 SL. This was an all-new, up-to-date sports touring car, albeit with 190 size and performance and an added level of luxury.
Like its forbearer, the 190 SL, it borrowed its chassis and running gear from a volume sedan, which in this case was the finned W111/112 that first appeared in 1959. Power was supplied by the overhead-cam six of the 220 SE, which had an increased displacement and was fitted with Bosch fuel injection. Similar to the 190 SL, its chassis was of monocoque construction and coil-and-wishbone front suspension. New was a low-pivot swing axle rear suspension, along with a transverse camber-compensating spring. Brakes were Girling front disc and Al-Fin rear drums with vacuum assist.
Mercedes-Benz 280 SL Roadster 1968

Dimensionally, it was almost a dead ringer for the 190 SL, as it only had 1.5 inches more in length. The additional weight of the stout structure for the new convertible was offset by the extra horsepower of the larger engine. This was also the first Mercedes-Benz to feature an automatic transmission on a sporting automobile and offer a simple fluid coupling instead of a torque converter.
Its styling was also fresh, although the big three-pointed star was carried over from previous models. Most interesting was the optional “pagoda” hardtop, so named for its upward curving sides, which offered an increased glass area and rigidity. Inside, the cockpit offered large, comfy reclining bucket seats and a typical Mercedes-Benz dash with a big round speedometer and tachometer. The 230 SL offered one of the industry’s first multi-purpose controls stalks for lights and wipers. Mercedes-Benz produced a total of 19,831 units before upgrading to 250 SL status, denoting a myriad of detail changes and a larger 2,496-cubic centimeter engine. After just 12 months and some 5,200 units, the Roadster was upgraded once again to 280 SL configuration, marking the introduction of the new M130 engine with 2,778 cubic centimeters and 180 horsepower.
Mercedes-Benz 280 SL Roadster 1968

The new 280 SL now included rear disc brakes as standard, an energy-absorbing steering column, and removable top latch handles for the windshield header. Its production spanned eight model years, with the final, and most popular, version producing 23,885 units from 1967 to 1971. Today, we value these Roadsters for their well-rounded drivability and their role in the evolution of Mercedes-Benz two-seaters.
This original Southern California-delivered car received a frame-off restoration in Germany. Its exterior is finished in its original color of Hellblau Metallic (DB 906), and it features a contrasting Parchment leather interior. It is perfect for touring, as it also features the four-speed automatic transmission, owner’s booklets, and tool kit, along with the removable signature pagoda hardtop and contrasting blue canvas top. Of course, during the restoration, the original engine was fully rebuilt, bringing the car to show standards.
Mercedes-Benz 280 SL Roadster 1968

Mercedes-Benz 280 SLs are long appreciated for their timeless style and excellent driving dynamics, and this example is both a valuable collector car and a very satisfying car to drive. Mercedes-Benz marketed these cars as “the sum total of everything the Mercedes-Benz engineers have learned about high-performance sporting machinery.” Now, four decades later, we could not agree more.

Jaguar E-Type Series 1 4.2-Litre 2+2 1966 - World Of Classic Cars -

Jaguar E-Type Series 1 4.2-Litre 2+2 1966

One can point to a hundred things that have made the E-Type Jaguar a success from the moment it appeared: a list price that originally undercut competition from Aston-Martin and Ferrari by half; performance years ahead of its time; looks that landed it in museums; and a legend that endures to the present day. But many other cars can also offer this sort of metaphorical timelessness. The Jaguar, however, also offers a concrete, mechanical appeal that’s made it not just wonderful to see but also relevant on the road today.
Chassis number 1E76624 began as a very original, unmolested, California black plate car before a recent comprehensive restoration was undertaken and completed in early 2014 by marque specialists at Classic Showcase. This Jaguar begs to be noticed.
Jaguar E-Type Series 1 4.2-Litre 2+2 1966

The restoration process is properly documented by a comprehensive DVD, and in addition to the requisite restoration of mechanical components back to factory specifications, it has been attended to with the fine details and craftsmanship that one will admire. During the restoration process, this XKE was disassembled, stripped, and the body was metal finished and properly fitted with body parts and new components. It then received a complete repaint and was wet-sanded and buffed to the deep luster seen today. All of the body parts were removed from the car and painted separately, and the engine and transmission have benefitted from a complete rebuild. Included in the restoration process was a thorough sorting of all systems, as well as a complete refurbishment of all major and minor electrical and mechanical subsystems. The upholstery was completely trimmed in all the proper materials. The seats were restored and redressed in the correct red leather. All new panels were created and reupholstered, as well as the headliner and sun visors, and the carpet was fitted and trimmed when installed. All brightwork was replated, as needed. With the completion of this beautiful interior, it has achieved a striking and proper look.
Jaguar E-Type Series 1 4.2-Litre 2+2 1966

This Jaguar offers all the performance of any other E-Type, but it also has the added convenience and comfort that comes with an additional nine inches of wheelbase and fold-down rear seats. As a weekend getaway car, it is without equal. As one writer once said, “There's simply no modern comparison.”

luni, 29 septembrie 2014

Ferrari 365 GT4 2+2 Prototipo by Pininfarina 1972 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 365 GT4 2+2 Prototipo by Pininfarina 1972

Ferrari’s next-generation grand tourer, the 365 GT4 2+2, represented a sharp leap into modern design for Ferrari. The smooth curves were replaced by sleek, modern angles, a tapered nose, and bodywork swage lines that recall that of the 365 GTB/4 Daytona but with an airy modern greenhouse. It was the ideal high-speed gentleman’s conveyance for the Ferrari owner who wanted to occasionally carry a pair of passengers.
The car shown here, chassis number 16293, was the third of three 365 GT4 2+2 prototypes produced. This hand-built show car has numerous detail differences from the production model that followed, including a unique door release and door latch and chrome trim along the top of the door frame. The glass was manufactured by a different supplier, and some of the interior trim is subtly different, such as its rare blue Momo steering wheel. The car was equipped with a Voxson radio with a factory power antenna and Koni shocks, which are still visible today.
Ferrari 365 GT4 2+2 Prototipo by Pininfarina 1972

Ferrari is known to have displayed chassis number 16293 at its stand at the 1972 Brussels Motor Show in Belgium. This is also the car that appears on the cover of the 365 GT4 2+2 brochure. After its display at Brussels, the car was reportedly used by Enzo Ferrari as his personal car.
After its time in Italy, the car made its way stateside, and, remarkably, it was eventually found on a donation lot in Southern California! Blackhorse Motors proceeded to restore it back to its original condition, which included refinishing the original color of Azzurro Hyperion, replating all of the chrome trim, and rebuilding or replacing all of the components. The Pelle Blue leather interior was redone to original specifications, and the interior, engine bay, engine, floor pans, and the bottom of the car are all reported to be in beautiful condition. Additionally, the owner states that the transmission, engine, differential, and chassis numbers are all correct.

Transitron Mk II Electric Prototype 1978 - World Of Classic Cars -

Transitron Mk II Electric Prototype 1978

The electric vehicle can be traced back to before the mid-1800s, when Robert Anderson, of Scotland, invented the first electric carriage, which was powered by an electric motor and non-rechargeable primary cells. Many of the first automobiles were electric, and at one point throughout history, they out-sold gasoline-powered vehicles. But with the expansion of lightweight, powerful internal-combustion engines, the introduction of the electric starter, and the cheaper availability of gasoline, the early 1900s saw the decline of personal electric vehicles.
References to the first electric motorcycle can be found in patents as early as the late 1860s, and over the next 100 years, numerous attempts to mass-produce two-wheel electric vehicles hit the market, including efforts by Popular Mechanics, the Indian Motorcycle Company, and Corbin-Gentry. In 1973, Mike Corbin set the first electric motorcycle land speed record at just over 101 mph.
Transitron Mk II Electric Prototype 1978

The 1978 Transitron Mk II Electric Prototype presented here is a one-of-a-kind machine that was built in Honolulu, Hawaii, by the Transitron Electric Corporation. Designers utilized the chassis from a 1971 Harley-Davidson XLH Sportster and reengineered the entire drivetrain by replacing the 900-cubic centimeter OHV internal combustion engine with a variable-speed electric motor and a series of deep-cycle batteries. Power is put to the rear wheel through an automatic four-speed transmission with chain-drive. Use of a proprietary control system with an integrated circuit mini-controller allows the machine to accelerate from 0–30 mph in 5–6 seconds. The machine’s instrument panel is mounted to the handlebars, which features an electric speedometer, a tachometer, and dual ammeters.
Transitron Mk II Electric Prototype 1978

The motorcycle was formerly part of the renowned collection of industrial designer Brooks Stevens. Stevens was often credited with the concept of “planned obsolescence,” and his impact on the transportation industry was legendary, as he designed such iconic vehicles as the Jeep Wagoneer, the Excalibur, the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile, and the Harley-Davidson Hydra-Glide. He also had a fine museum of automobiles and motorcycles in Mequon, Wisconsin, where the Transitron was displayed until its acquisition by the previous owner in 1995. The current owner acquired the prototype soon thereafter and has continued to display the unique Electric amongst other historic motorcycles.
This is a wonderful survivor from the dawn of the modern electric vehicle.

Indian 4 HP Single 1911 - World Of Classic Cars -

Indian 4 HP Single 1911

With the days of the motorized bicycle behind them, Indian took the lead in the American motorcycle industry, producing rugged, powerful, and reliable machines for a network of thousands of dealers both at home and abroad. In the early 1910s, Indian ramped up production more than three-fold, eventually producing 30,000 machines in 1913. They planned to further expand their operations with numerous additions at their Springfield, Massachusetts, factory. Racing victories, including a sweep of the first three places at the Isle of Man Senior TT in 1911, helped propel the company into the mainstream, and increased advertising aided in making Indian a household name.
Indian 4 HP Single 1911

The lineup for the 1911 model year saw several improvements over that of the previous year. The 19-cubic inch Singles were discontinued due to the desire for more power, and a heavier clutch, which is operated by the standard lever on the left side of the tank, was designed for all of the chain-drive models.
This 1911 Indian Single is preserved in remarkable, unrestored, original condition. It features Indian’s reliable four-horsepower, single-cylinder engine with the original magneto ignition and Hedstrom carburetor. A single-speed countershaft transfers power from the motor to the rear wheel via front and rear drive-chains. The machine still retains its original red paint and countless accessories, including the original front-wheel drive speedometer, an acetylene-powered headlight and taillight, a manual Indian horn, an accessory air pump, a leather tool bag with the original tool kit, extremely rare leather saddlebags, and an original Indian flag, which mounts to the handlebars. Importantly, the Indian is in fully operational running condition.
Indian 4 HP Single 1911

Few examples of early teens Indians still in running condition exist today. Perhaps none are more complete and original than that which is presented here.

duminică, 28 septembrie 2014

Indian 4 HP Single Board-Track Racer 1911 - World Of Classic Cars -

Indian 4 HP Single Board-Track Racer 1911

Almost immediately, the Indian Motocycle Company realized the importance of participation in racing and its effect on sales. With board-track racing emerging as the most popular motorcycle sport in the United States, riders such as Paul “Dare-Devil” Derkum, Jake DeRosier, and Charles “Fearless” Balke brought the company into the limelight during the last part of the first decade of the 1900s, and coupled with increased advertising, phenomenal racing victories, and expanded production capacity, Indian ascended to the forefront of the industry, boasting over 1,200 dealers around the country.
Indian 4 HP Single Board-Track Racer 1911

The outstanding single-cylinder 1911 Indian Board-Track Racer presented here is among the most original early racing machines in existence, and it remains in virtually as-raced condition. The machine features a four horsepower, 30.5-cubic inch pocket-valve engine with a mechanically operated intake valve, a Hedstrom carburetor, and single-speed drive. This motorcycle retains its original factory paint and has remnants of the dealer decal still present on the tank. It features factory-dropped racing handlebars and an original Messinger seat, as well as the original Hedstrom racing spark plug. Aside from the tires, all other parts are original, including the 28x2.25-inch racing-type rims.
Indian 4 HP Single Board-Track Racer 1911

This machine has been on display at the Wheels Through Time Museum in North Carolina for over a decade, and it has been run for visitors on a regular basis. Few genuine examples of early Indian racing machines exist today, and even fewer remain in original running condition.

sâmbătă, 27 septembrie 2014

Ferrari 360 Challenge 2001 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 360 Challenge 2001

The Ferrari Challenge series was created in 1993 to create a single-model racing series for Ferrari’s own customers to compete against each other using Ferrari’s current mid-engined V-8 road cars as a platform. Not only would this engage more of Ferrari’s dedicated road-car clients with the motorsport side of the company, but Ferrari hoped it would increase their devotion to the brand after seeing what their cars were capable of when fully unleashed on a closed circuit. After a few years, this proved to be a successful program for the Scuderia, and many customers were vying to compete in the series with the support of their local dealership.
Ferrari 360 Challenge 2001

By the year 2000, as road-car production had transitioned from the 355 to the 360 Modena the year before, Ferrari released a Challenge variant of the 360 to phase the 355 Challenge out of competition by 2001. Just like the Challenge models before it, the 360 Challenge retains the same horsepower rating as the standard 360, but it has been drastically modified, with increased track performance specifically in mind. The entire interior was stripped of all luxurious appointments and replaced with a full complement of weight-saving carbon fiber trim, a full roll cage, a fire suppression system, Lexan windows, and a Magneti Marelli LCD instrument display that was capable of recording onboard telemetry.
Ferrari 360 Challenge 2001

Mechanical updates include titanium rods, a dry sump, a higher compression ratio, a racing clutch, and a 100-liter fuel cell. All of these improvements helped contribute to an overall weight that was 250 pounds less than the standard 360.
This 2001 Ferrari 360 Challenge, currently with its second owner, was purchased by him in early 2002, after only being used once at Road America in the 2001 Challenge season. The car has been enjoyed enthusiastically at a number of Challenge series races and private track events at locations all over the east coast of the United States since then. The Ferrari specialists at Classic Coach in Elizabeth, New Jersey, always kept the car in race-ready mechanical condition through routine servicing, with the most recent timing-belt service being completed in December 2013. In 2006, Classic Coach installed a real spoiler, at the request of the current owner, in order to provide more downforce at high speeds; this is an improvement that is seen on many 360 Challenge cars. It should also be noted that this 360 Challenge had a minor track incident in September 2003, and as a result, the front and rear bumpers were replaced by Classic Coach.
Ferrari 360 Challenge 2001

Although formal Ferrari Challenge competition has progressed through the F430 and into the 458 Challenge, the 360 Challenge still remains a potent automobile in its own right. In addition to being eligible for continued racing in the Ferrari Challenge club racing series, many former Challenge racers are still campaigned today at private and Ferrari Club of America track days, and this example is certainly ready to jump back into the fray.