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Ferrari F40 by Scaglietti 1990 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari F40 by Scaglietti 1990

In 1987, there was a supercar war raging between the big three European sports car manufacturers. Lamborghini’s Countach had turned the sports car world upside down with its radical styling and blistering performance. In 1986, Porsche’s innovative 959 introduced a number of automotive firsts and attained a top speed of 197 mph, claiming the title of the world’s fastest street legal production car. Enzo Ferrari, stubborn as he was, would not let that record stay in Stuttgart. Ferrari’s F40 was developed from Ferrari’s 288 GTO Evoluzione, and it broke a barrier akin to Glamorous Glennis breaking the sound barrier 40 years earlier: the F40 was the first production car to break 200 mph, registering a top speed of 201.4 mph.
Ferrari F40 by Scaglietti 1990

The F40 was named in celebration of the Scuderia’s 40th birthday, and it was intended for a limited production run of around 400 units, but strong demand pushed the total production number to 1,311, with only 213 destined for the United States. Of course, Ferrari delivered F40s to enthusiasts all over the world, but every F40 to leave the factory bore Rossa Corsa paint and a left-hand drive configuration. Sadly, with Enzo’s death on August 14th, 1988, the F40 was the last car to receive the blessing of “Il Commendatore” before his passing, signaling the end of an era for one of the most iconic marques in automotive history.
Ferrari F40 by Scaglietti 1990

It is easy to see why the F40 was so desirable. It featured a V-8 twin-turbo engine that could produce a monstrous 478 horsepower, and it pioneered the use of carbon fiber for its chassis, making the F40 a feather-light 2,400 pounds. Aesthetically, its sleek design was an example of form following function, providing both high-speed stability and fantastic airflow to the engine to keep it from overheating. Once one has carefully slide into the lightweight bucket seats, it is instantly clear that the F40 makes no compromises in the pursuit of performance. It was stripped out for racing: it had no carpets, it utilized door pulls instead of traditional handles, and it could be optioned with roll-up or fixed windows (installing power-operated windows was simply out of the question) in order to save weight. In 1987, the list price was roughly $400,000, but many traded hands for much more than that at the time.
Ferrari F40 by Scaglietti 1990

Chassis 87085 was finished in Rossa Corsa, with the distinctive red cloth Stoffa Vigogna upholstery, and it was the 79th of just 213 examples originally intended for the U.S. market. Shortly after its construction was completed in Maranello, the car was sent to its first owner, a Paul Goldenberg of La Habra, California. Goldenberg both drove and showed his car frequently, and it made appearances at both the Ferrari Owners’ Club U.S. Concours in 1991 and Concourso Italiano in 1993. The F40 left Goldenberg’s ownership, with just 6,000 miles on the odometer, when it was traded to Ferrari of Beverley Hills for a new F50 in 1995. Five years later, the F40 returned to the inventory of Ferrari of Beverly Hills and was sold in December 2000 to a resident of Illinois.
Ferrari F40 by Scaglietti 1990

In 2002, chassis 87085 returned to its second home in The Golden State, when it had the privilege of joining the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. There, it was displayed as not only one of the finest examples of the F40 extant but also as one of the most important automobiles to ever wear the Cavallino Rampante. During its time at the Petersen, this car accumulated less than 100 miles, it was stored in a climate-controlled environment, where it was viewed every year by hundreds of thousands of car enthusiasts, and it remained in fantastic condition.
Ferrari F40 by Scaglietti 1990

Upon departing the Petersen Museum, this F40 was recommissioned for more frequent use by Norbert Hofer at Gran Touring Classics in Long Beach, California, to ensure that the car would function as it should. More recently, it was fully serviced by Autosports Design in Huntington Station, New York, to the tune of $15,000. There, this F40 was brought back to very good mechanical specification.
As the last car to gain the approval of Il Commendatore before his passing, the F40 is an icon in our own time. An F40 is often considered to be one of the most visceral experiences one can have on four wheels, and it is surely not a car for the faint of heart, but it is the perfect automobile for someone who wants to experience one of the greatest analog supercars ever produced. Its performance credentials still stand tall when pitted against supercars produced today, proving that all the engineering beneath its Rosso Corsa paint was years ahead of its time.

Porsche 959 'Komfort' 1988 - World Of Classic Cars -

Porsche 959 'Komfort' 1988

Whenever a car company produces a model that is capable of traveling near or above the fabled 200 mph mark, people tend to take notice. Many super exotic sports cars on sale today are just able to break that seemingly mythical barrier, showcasing the years of research put forth by their engineers and designers. In 1985, that number was almost unfathomable when Porsche unveiled the 959 at the Frankfurt Auto Show. Not only could the car reach a top speed of 197 mph, but it could also do so while carrying the weight of a number of features that were considered non-essential to chasing a world-record top speed, and many of which that had never been seen on a production car before.
Porsche 959 'Komfort' 1988

What made the 959 so special upon its introduction was the plethora of technological firsts for a factory-produced road car. Advanced materials included extensive use of carbon-Kevlar and aluminum to form the main tub and surrounding body panels. An adjustable suspension with rear hydraulics, an active four-wheel drive system, tire pressure sensors, and hollow-spoke magnesium wheels were all advanced technologies that were years ahead of their time. Of course, all of these breathtaking new features came with a price tag to match, a $300,000 one.
Porsche 959 'Komfort' 1988

One might draw parallels of the 959 with today’s Bugatti Veyron. Certainly, as with the Veyron, the factory lost MONEY on every one of the 283s it built, earning the model its nickname of “Porsche’s Gift to Its Favorite Customers.” Each car cost Porsche nearly twice its list price to build. In the United States, putting a 959 in your garage was even more difficult, as they were not specified to be compliant with federal DOT and emissions standards. However, that didn’t stop a few influential Americans from acquiring Porsche’s newest supercar under the newly created Show and Display law of 1999. The law was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen, and there is no doubt why the 959 appealed to these two titans of technology, as the engineering innovations encapsulated in the Porsche 959 were simply earth-shattering.
Porsche 959 'Komfort' 1988

Individuals who have spent time behind the wheel of air-cooled 911s will surely feel familiarity in the driver’s seat of a 959. The ignition switch still resides on the left, and the gauges are still spread across the dash, with the tachometer located in the center. The leather-swathed seat pattern was new and unique to the 959, and the seats were electronically adjustable, of course.
As outlined in its Porsche Certificate of Authenticity, this 1988 959 Komfort model was finished tastefully in SILVER, with a burgundy leather interior and contrasting seat inserts in tri-tone silver and grey. This 959 was originally delivered to Spain, and its first owner was a well-known industrialist who kept it in his possession until 2006, when it was purchased by its second owner, Mr. Robert Slutz, who also resided in Spain.
Porsche 959 'Komfort' 1988

In 2011, Mr. Slutz relocated to the United States, and this 959 was imported by Autosport Designs, Inc., in Huntington Station, New York, on his behalf, under the very law that was created to allow its importation. Upon arriving at Autosport, this 959 received a complete engine-out service that totaled to nearly $40,000, bringing it to its current, freshly maintained and outstanding driving condition.
As the 959 was never originally offered in the United States, freshly imported and well-sorted examples are in high demand by collectors. At its introduction, the 959 was light-years ahead of its time in terms of technology, engineering, and performance, and many would argue that it set the stage for the 21st century supercar, even showcasing features that may yet become standard fare in tomorrow’s supercars. This 959, which is in spectacular original condition is a quality example of one of Porsche’s most innovative and legendary sports cars.

Ferrari F50 1995 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari F50 1995

If Ferrari received one complaint about the superlative 40th anniversary F40 supercar that debuted in 1987, it was that too many examples were produced. The F40 was originally positioned as a boutique collectible of limited production, but it proved to be so popular that it was eventually manufactured in a quantity of over 1,300 examples. When planning a 50th anniversary model a few years later, Ferrari made certain that just 349 cars were built, establishing a rarity far more becoming of a Maranello hypercar.
Four years of development went into the aptly named F50, and as much as the model is a companion to its predecessor, it is also a study in beautiful contrasts. The F40’s turbocharged V-8 was eschewed in favor of a naturally aspirated V-12, which was a 4.7-liter version of the 1990 F1 engine that also drew from the 333 SP championship sports car’s motor. Thus far, it is also the only V-12 engine with five valves per cylinder that Ferrari has ever mounted in a road going car. Generous use of carbon fiber, particularly in the body tub and shell, ensured optimal power-to-weight ratio for the race-bred model. Its performance was astounding, as expected, with 520 horsepower and 347 foot-pounds of torque thrusting the car to 60 mph from standstill in just 3.6 seconds and producing a top speed of 202 mph.
Ferrari F50 1995

A further contrast to the F40 was evident in Pininfarina’s gorgeous F50 coachwork, which was a far cry from the wedge styling of the earlier car. Beautiful curves characterized every surface of the new model, from the chin spoiler and wings to the aerodynamically engineered tail wing. The design’s heritage appeal was boosted by a removable hardtop, which gave the model a distinctly different visual character whether in berlinetta or barchetta form, but each was equally ravishing. The F50 is rare, powerful, and extraordinarily beautiful, even by the standards of modern supercars, and it occupies a unique link in the chain of Ferrari’s top-shelf automobiles.
Ferrari F50 1995

The car offered here, chassis number 104121, was one of 55 U.S.-delivery examples built, and it is, in all likelihood. This F50, which has only 230 actual miles recorded, is completely untouched and as-new in all regards, including its factory paintwork, which is thin enough to see the carbon fiber beneath, 100% original, and still in outstanding condition. Importantly, the digital dashboard is still completely and fully functional.

Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype Photos - World Of Classic Cars -

Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype

Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype 1958 - World Of Classic Cars -

Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype 1958

Englishman Brian Lister used the facilities of his father’s Cambridge wrought iron shop, George Lister & Sons, as the basis for a career in race car engineering, which then blossomed into one in sports cars during the early 1950s. Starting with an MG platform in 1954, Lister soon graduated to two-litre Bristol engines, which he stuffed into low-weight chassis that were packaged with aerodynamic open-nosed bodywork. Famed racer Archie Scott-Brown drove one of these Lister-Bristols to 5th overall and 1st in class at Silverstone in 1954, where it stunned a field of Jaguar C-Types.
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype 1958

In 1957, customer Norman Hillwood insisted that Lister install a 3.4-litre Jaguar XK engine into his car. This marked the beginning of the engine-chassis mating that bore Lister his greatest acclaim. At the British Empire Trophy at Oulton Park on 6 April 1957, Scott-Brown’s Lister-Jaguar roared to a 1st overall finish, notably besting Roy Salvadori’s Aston Martin DBR1. Lister-Jaguars were well on their way to great success, but one more major innovation remained for the car’s legend to truly take hold, and that would lie in the forthcoming coachwork.
In February 1958, Lister introduced his latest model to the motoring press, which is the very car offered here. The new Lister-Jaguar exaggerated the prior car’s gently bulbous, Maserati-like wings, which now converged into a hugely sloping bonnet that cleverly masked the tall XK block. Just behind the engine compartment was a lowered cowl that reduced the windscreen’s overall profile, enabling the top of the glass (required to be a certain height by FIA rules) to peer just over the engine compartment and drastically reducing the car’s frontal profile and corresponding drag coefficient.
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype 1958

Unlike Lister’s previous cars, which were largely built in-house, the new model’s body panels were shaped under contract by Williams and Pritchard, and they were offered to customers in either aluminium or magnesium. Mechanical innovations to this model included inboard Girling disc brakes and a larger fuel tank. With the new Lister’s bulging, knoblike proportions, it was little wonder that the car quickly became nicknamed the “Knobbly”.
The success of Brian Lister’s designs had not gone unnoticed by famed American privateer Briggs Cunningham, who brought his technical director, Alfred Momo, with him to Lister’s shop in early 1958 and promptly ordered two cars that had already been earmarked for the Ecurie Ecosse (explaining this car’s chassis designation of “EE”). The car offered here, chassis number BHL EE 101, is the first of these cars, and it is, therefore, recognised as the bona fide Knobbly prototype.
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype 1958

BHL EE 101 was delivered in time for the 12 Hours of Sebring, which took place on 22 March 1958, and it, along with Cunningham’s other new Jaguar-powered Knobbly, was prepared for competition by Momo, with particular attention to the FIA-mandated three-litre displacement limit, which necessitated using a shortened-stroke version of the basic XK block. Both Listers and three D-Types entered at Sebring that day, but BHL EE 101 retired early due to piston failure, marking an unusual failure for a Jaguar racing engine. Future three-litre FIA races would be run with a bored version of Jag’s 2.4-litre block, which proved to be far more reliable.
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype 1958

In SCCA competition, however, Formula Libre class rules set no limit on displacement, and the wide-angle 3.8-litre engine from Jaguar’s successful D-Type was sourced and used in American races, as was as an experimental 3.75-litre Jaguar racing engine that was personally tuned by Momo. Following the disappointment at Sebring with Scott-Brown behind the wheel (which involved a dramatic incident with Olivier Gendebien’s Ferrari Testa Rossa), this car was mostly driven for the Cunningham Team by the famed Walt Hansgen, who piloted the car in dominating fashion to a 1958 SCCA Championship.
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype 1958

Hansgen’s impressive litany of wins began with a 1st overall at the President’s Cup in Marlboro, Maryland, on 20 April, after which Vice-President Richard Nixon personally awarded him the President’s Cup Trophy, as captured in a period photograph. First overall finishes continued at the Virginia International Raceway on 4 May, Cumberland on 18 May, Bridgehampton on 1 June, Lime Rock on 15 June, and Road America on 22 June. A number of 2nd overall and 1st in class finishes were also peppered throughout this period, which concluded with a resounding 1st overall at the season’s ultimate contest at the VIR on 5 October, securing Hansgen the 1958 Class C Modified Championship.
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype 1958

In 1959, Cunningham again fielded his two Lister Knobblies, also adding one of the new Costin-bodied Listers to the team. Unfortunately, the Knobbly’s ability to remain competitive against the evolving technology faded, particularly with the advent of Lance Reventlow’s Scarabs and the rear-engine Cooper-Monacos. Despite the inevitable, Hansgen and BHL EE 101 still managed to take 2nd overall at Montgomery on 9 August 1959. During the Knobbly’s use by the Cunningham Team, Momo revised the car’s front bonnet to a sweeping short-nose style, which was a modification that was often conducted by teams running Listers in order to negate the original design’s inherent front lift at high speed.
Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype 1958

Cunningham retained possession of the Knobbly until well after he used it competitively, but he eventually sold it in the mid-1960s, to well-known collector Herb Wetanson, along with one of his Lightweight E-Type racers. Wetanson, essentially only interested in the E-Type, soon sold the Knobbly to British driver and dealer Chris Drake, who raced the car at historic events during the early 1970s. The Lister was then acquired by collector Roger Williams in the early 1980s, and it was finally treated to a thorough bout of sympathetic freshening.
This rare prototype Knobbly has more recently been owned by American collector Terry Larson, and it still benefits from its 1980s restoration, which included the refurbishment of many of Momo’s original preparations, such as the rear jacking points, the roll bar, and the OIL tank cover, as well as the original 42-gallon fuel tank and rear bodywork. The car is currently fitted with a 3.8-litre D-Type racing engine, and it is still accompanied by the original Momo-tuned 3.75-litre Jaguar engine.

Facel Vega FV2B Coupé 1956 - World Of Classic Cars -

Facel Vega FV2B Coupé 1956

Jean Daninos was a Parisian-born engineer of Greek ancestry. He worked for Citroën in body engineering and as the head of special vehicles, but he left after the Michelin takeover. He founded Métallon, a fabricator of kitchen cabinets and sinks, and in 1939, he established Forges et Atéliers de Construction d’Eure-et-Loire, or Facel for short. The two firms combined and made aero engines during World War II.
After the war, Facel-Métallon produced bodies for the Dyna Panhard, Simca, and Ford of France’s lovely Cométe, as well as some quite stunning one-off coachwork, notably on his own Bentley Mk VI. In 1954, Daninos decided to try his hand at a complete car. On a tubular chassis frame with box-section crossmembers, he mounted a Chrysler hemi V-8 engine, initially the smaller DeSoto version.
Facel Vega FV2B Coupé 1956

The gearbox was either Chrysler’s Powerflite or the French Pont-a-Mousson four-speed manual, whilst the body was Facel’s own, executed in steel with stainless brightwork. Over the years, larger Chrysler engines were fitted, along with power assists and better brakes.
This well-preserved original Black Facel Vega Coupé presents very well. The paint exhibits a deep shine, and the Dove Grey leather interior exhibits a pleasing patina. Its current owner has just completed a mechanical and cosmetic freshening, which included a complete fuel service and a carburettor rebuild. He reports today that it continues to run strong and shift and track properly, whilst the cosmetic attention paid to the engine bay and chassis has brought the car to an impressive standard. The carpeted boot is also nicely detailed.
Facel Vega FV2B Coupé 1956

The car is equipped with electric windows, power steering, and Chrysler’s excellent Powerflite automatic gearbox, making it a delight to drive. The Facel Vega is a subtle crossbreed of French flair with American practicality, and it is comfortable on all continents. It is a grand routier in the proper sense, as it is fast, stylish, and elegant.

Toyota 2000GT - World Of Classic Cars - Rank 171

Toyota 2000GT 1968

The Toyota 2000GT is a limited-production, front-engine, rear-wheel drive, two-seat, hardtop coupé grand tourer designed by Toyota in collaboration with Yamaha. First displayed to the public at the Tokyo Motor Show in 1965, the 2000GT was manufactured under contract by Yamaha between 1967 and 1970. In Japan, it was exclusive to Toyota's Japanese retail sales channel called Toyota Store.
The 2000GT revolutionized the automotive world's view of Japan. The 2000GT demonstrated that Japanese auto manufacturers could produce a sports car to rival those of Europe, in contrast to Japan's image at the time as a producer of imitative and stodgily practical vehicles. Reviewing a pre-production 2000GT in 1967, Road & Track magazine summed up the car as "one of the most exciting and enjoyable cars we've driven", and compared it favorably to the Porsche 911. Today, the 2000GT is seen as the first seriously collectible Japanese car and the first "Japanese supercar". Examples of the 2000GT have sold at auction for as much as US $1,200,000.

Background
Toyota 2000GT 1967

Much of the work was done by Yamaha, which in addition to its wide product range of the time also did much work for other Japanese manufacturers. Many credit the German-American designer Albrecht Goertz, a protégé of Raymond Loewy, as inspiration for the car, who had previously worked with Nissan to create the Silvia. He had gone to Yamaha in Japan in the early 1960s to modernize Nissan's two-seater sports car called the Fairlady. A prototype was built, but Nissan decided not to pursue the project with Yamaha. Yamaha also contracted for Toyota, then perceived as the most conservative of the Japanese car manufacturers. Wishing to improve their image, Toyota accepted the proposal, but employed a design from their own designer Satoru Nozaki.

Styling
Toyota 2000GT 1967

The 2000GT design is widely considered a classic in its own right. Its smoothly flowing "coke bottle styling" bodywork was executed in aluminium and featured pop-up headlights, as well as large plexiglas covered driving lamps on either side of the grille similar to those on the Toyota Sports 800. The design scarcely featured bumpers at all, and the plexiglas driving lamp covers in particular are rather easily damaged. The car was extremely low, just 45.7 in (116 cm) to the highest point of the roof. In 1969, the front was modified slightly, making the driving lamps smaller and changing the shape of the turn signals. The rear turn signals were enlarged at the same time, and some alterations were made to modernise the interior. The last few vehicles were fitted with air conditioning and had automatic transmission as an option. These cars had an additional scoop fitted underneath the grille to supply air to the A/C unit. Two custom open-top models were built for the James Bond film You Only Live Twice, but a factory-produced convertible was never offered during the car's production run.
Toyota 2000GT Targa 1967


The interior offered comfortable, if cramped, accommodation and luxury touches like a rosewood-veneer dashboard and an auto-seeking radio tuner. At the time, Road & Track felt that the interior was up to par for a "luxurious GT", calling it an impressive car "in which to sit or ride - or simply admire."

Technical details

The engine was a 2.0 L (121 in³) straight-6 (the 3M) based on the engine in the top-of-the-line Toyota Crown sedan. It was transformed by Yamaha with a new double overhead camshaft head into a 112 kW (150 hp) sports car engine. Carburation was through three two-barrel Solex 40 PHH units. Nine special MF-12 models were also built with the larger but SOHC 2.3 L 2M engine. The car was available with three different final drives. Fitted with a 4.375 ratio axle, the car was said[by whom?] to be capable of reaching 135 mph (217 km/h) and achieve 7.59 L/100 km (31 mpg-US; 37 mpg-imp).
Toyota 2000GT 1968


The engine was longitudinally mounted and drove the rear wheels through a five-speed manual transmission. A limited slip differential was fitted, and in a first for a Japanese car, all-round power-assisted disc brakes. The atypical emergency brake gripped the rear disc directly.

Production

Only 351 (regular production cars) of the 2000GT were built, figures comparable to elite Italian supercar production of the day. According to Toyota and Yamaha data, there were 233 MF10s, 109 MF10Ls, and nine MF12Ls. All were actually built by Yamaha; it took two years for production vehicles to emerge. In America, the 2000GT sold for about $6,800, much more than contemporary Porsches and Jaguars. It is believed that no profit was made on the cars despite their high price; they were more concept cars and a demonstration of ability than a true production vehicle. About 60 cars reached North America and the others were similarly thinly spread worldwide. Most 2000GTs were painted either red or white.

Racing
Toyota 2000GT 1968

Toyota entered the 2000GT in competition at home, coming third in the 1966 Japanese Grand Prix and winning the Fuji 24-Hour Race in 1967. In addition, the car set several FIA world records for speed and endurance in a 72-hour test. Unfortunately, the record car was destroyed in a pace car accident and eventually scrapped. These records shortly prompted Porsche to prepare a 911R especially to beat this record.

Carroll Shelby would also enter a pair of 2000GTs to compete in the SCCA production car races competing in the CP category. Initially Shelby built three cars, including one spare.
Toyota 2000GT 1967

Although performing well, 1968 was the only season the car competed in the US. Toyota took back one of the cars and rebuilt it into a replica of their record car, which still resides in Japan. The two remaining Shelby cars still reside in the United States.

2000GT Open-Top, the “Bond Model”

The 2000GT made its most famous screen appearance in the 1967 James Bond movie You Only Live Twice, most of which was filmed in Japan. Even though the car was never commercially available as a convertible, two were made specially for the film. However, they did not have roofs, just an upholstered hump at the rear of the cabin to simulate a folded top, and therefore were not fully functioning convertibles. Prior to the decision to make fully roofless cars, building the car as a targa was tried, allegedly due to Sean Connery's height not allowing him to fit into the ultra-low coupé version. This retained the hatchback of the original car, but eliminated the rear side windows. However, when the Targa was completed, Connery's head stuck out of the top to such an extent that it was decided it looked too ridiculous and that roofless versions would have to be made if the car was to be featured in the film. Toyota were able to create a convertible version in a mere two weeks after being notified of this shortcoming. The car was mainly driven by his girlfriend Aki (Akiko Wakabayashi) in the film.

Today
Toyota 2000GT 1967

Although not quite as well known to the general public as later Japanese sports cars like the Nissan Z, the 2000GT is regarded by many collectors as possibly the first highly collectible Japanese car. As of 2010, good examples can reach very high auction prices, though parts availability is a problem. Some combination of interesting provenance (particularly the first and second owners) and cosmetic perfection seems to be the formula for the highest auction values.