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joi, 23 octombrie 2014

Maserati 3500 GT Coupe 'Speciale' by Frua 1961 - World Of Classic Cars -

Maserati 3500 GT Coupe 'Speciale' by Frua 1961

Few coachbuilders of the 1960s produced as audacious coachwork on Maserati chassis as Pietro Frua’s Carrozzeria Turin. In particular, Frua’s talented hands were responsible for some of the most audacious bodies for the “super Maserati,” the 5000 GT. Each 5000 GT was a unique, bespoke, tailored automobile, and it is only fitting that Frua’s unique designs on those chassis would inspire special creations for other Maseratis as well.
The car presented here, chassis number AM101.1496, is one of two similar 3500 GT chassis bodied by Frua, both in 1961. The other was AM101.1494, and as its whereabouts have been unknown for many years, it is believed to be lost or even destroyed. Smooth, sleek side panels, curved only by a sharp crease at the beltline, connect a stunning tail. The “of the moment” quad headlamps are set in an attractively custom-designed bezel, and a thin wraparound bumper accentuates an aggressive nose with a deep inset.
Maserati 3500 GT Coupe 'Speciale' by Frua 1961

Typical of Frua, who loved fine detail, the car is sprinkled with delicate chrome accents, including miniature Maserati tridents above the quarter windows. Later, circa 1963, Frua built two more cars to a similar design in the fuel-injected 3500 GTi series.
Frua completed the 3500 GT in May 1961, delivering it to prominent Maserati dealer Martinelli & Sonvico, of Lugano, Switzerland. A month later, it was registered for the first time, as BE 999997, to Jacques Bordier in the city of Bern, Switzerland.
The car was later imported to the United States, and by the mid-1970s, it was in the hands of a pair of enthusiasts in Chicago, although it was missing its original rear window and engine. It passed into the hands of a Dr. Harms, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and then to Frank Mandarano, the well-known supplier of Maserati cars, parts, and knowledge and the founder of the Concorso Italiano. Mandarano owned the unique Frua 3500 GT for several years before selling it in 1988 to Doug Speer, from whom it was acquired in 1993 by Jerry Wood.
Maserati 3500 GT Coupe 'Speciale' by Frua 1961

In 1996, renowned Maserati collector John Bookout became the car’s next owner. Bookout extensively researched its history with his typical thoroughness, including contacting Adolfo Orsi and Frua historian Stefan Dierkes. Together, the men were able to conclusively confirm the car’s identity as chassis number AM101.1496, and Bookout embarked upon the restoration. Before work had been completed, he sold the car in 2007 to another well-known marque enthusiast, Keith Duly, who is well known for the quality of his own restorations.
Duly completed the car’s return-to-original condition, with the cosmetic work being performed by Chris Charlton, of Oxford,
Maserati 3500 GT Coupe 'Speciale' by Frua 1961

Maine, whose restorations have won Best of Show at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, and the mechanical work being performed by Duly’s own shop. The work completed included a careful inventory of all of the car’s original components, with as many as possible being restored and reused to ensure authenticity. An earlier replacement engine installed in the car was found to be in poor condition, so it was replaced with a freshly rebuilt 3500 GT unit, which is a swap that has occurred in many 3500 GTs of this era.
The car, originally red with light brown Connolly leather upholstery, was stunningly refinished in Azzuro Metallizato with tan leather upholstery and grey carpets, resulting in a wonderfully handsome color combination for such a daring design.
Maserati 3500 GT Coupe 'Speciale' by Frua 1961

After its restoration was complete, the 3500 GT Coupe Speciale was finally debuted, to much acclaim, at the 2011 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. It was acquired by its present owner a short time later, and while in his care, it has continued to be shown at concours and receive the best of care and service by Autosport Designs. This Speciale was recently shown at the 2014 Greenwich Concours, where it was awarded Most Outstanding Maserati, in a field where Maserati was a featured marque. The consignor notes that the car has been “serviced religiously,” and as such, it would be proper to continue on the show circuit and no doubt be a supreme pleasure to drive!
Maserati 3500 GT Coupe 'Speciale' by Frua 1961

Few 3500 GTs have the same epic proportions and aggressive demeanor as the 5000 GT, but this one does, and, indeed, it can be considered the only true “junior” 5000 GT known to survive. In addition, it has been carefully restored by a marque expert for his personal enjoyment following years of careful research and attention by such devoted connoisseurs as John Bookout.

miercuri, 22 octombrie 2014

Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti 1965 - World Of Classic Cars -

THE 275 GTB ALLOY
Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti 1965

By the mid-1960s, it seemed as if Ferrari could do no wrong. With their competition cars emerging successful at nearly every major race on the calendar and their road cars attracting more and more customers every year, the company had handily cemented its reputation within the history of the automobile, and each new car that exited the factory gates in Maranello seemed to be better than the last. Ferrari’s 275 GTB was a clear evolution of the 250 GT SWB and the 250 GT/L Lusso. It was introduced at the 1964 Paris Auto Show to replace the aging 250 series of grand touring cars, and it marked the beginning of another fantastic series of V-12-powered berlinettas.
Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti 1965

At the time, the 275 was the most advanced road going Ferrari ever produced, as it utilized a 3.3-liter version of the classic Colombo V-12. In an effort to improve handling, the overall height of the engine was reduced to achieve a lower center of gravity, and the 275 GTB was the first car from the marque to boast a four-wheel independent suspension and a rear-mounted five-speed transaxle gearbox, helping it to achieve a better weight distribution at the same time.
The car proved to be better in every way than the cars it replaced, as it boasted all of the performance that the iconic SWB offered but was still just as luxurious as the Lusso. The 275 GTB produced 280 horsepower and was capable of sprinting from 0 to 60 mph in just over six seconds, leading to a top speed of 160 mph. The long-nose construction on the later cars also helped eliminate the undesirable high-speed lift characteristics of the early variants, further increasing the already flexible nature of the car. Its combination of incredible performance with enough space for a weekend’s worth of luggage for two clearly made this a dual-purpose grand touring car and the perfect choice for the well-heeled individual looking to win races, drive across Europe, or both. As such, customers had free reign to outfit their cars as they saw fit, leading to some cars leaving the factory outfitted with racing in mind, while other were outfitted primarily for comfort and touring.
Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti 1965

Of course, the most desirable option was alloy bodywork. Some of Ferrari’s most competitive competition cars were bodied in aluminum, including the 250 GTO and competition versions of the 250 SWB. This option was considerably lighter than the normal steel bodywork and was often selected by clients looking to race their new cars, as the use of aluminum allowed them to shed a few unnecessary pounds and therefore increase their car’s performance. While the design of the car was penned by Pininfarina, the bodies were hand-beaten by Scaglietti’s craftsman in Modena. By the time production switched over to the more powerful 275 GTB/4, only a handful of aluminum-bodied examples had been produced, cementing their desirability for years to come.

CURRENT OWNERSHIP FOR 40 YEARS
Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti 1965

The example shown here, chassis number 08069, was manufactured in 1965 by Ferrari. It was a long-nose 275 GTB with alloy bodywork and triple Weber carburetors, and it was finished in Argento Metallizzato (106-E-1) over full Nero (VM 8500) leather seats, according to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini. It was subsequently delivered new to Ferrari’s official dealership in Milan, M. Gastone Crepaldi S.a.s. Later that year, Crepaldi sold the car to its first private owner, a Mr. Zaniboni, who was residing in Italy. Sometime thereafter, Zaniboni sold the car to its second Italian owner, a Mr. Ghisa, another Italian citizen who was living in the city of Trieste.
Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti 1965

It is believed that this 275 GTB was exported from Italy to the United States sometime in the early 1970s and was then subsequently purchased by Ronald DeLorenzo, of Youngstown, Ohio. DeLorenzo listed the car for sale in the July 1974 issue of Road & Track magazine. The advertisement notes that it was still wearing its silver and black interior, with 31,000 kilometers on the odometer, and it further mentioned that DeLorenzo was the car’s only owner in the United States. After seeing the advertisement, the car’s current owner contacted DeLorenzo and purchased it for $6,700. Since then, the car has remained in the state of Ohio, with the same caretaker, a well-regarded collector and enthusiast of Italian cars, for the past forty years, all but nine years of the car’s entire life.
Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti 1965

The car is remarkably well preserved, with its only deviation from its original configuration being a single repaint in red by Joe Piscazzi in Akron, Ohio, early on in his ownership. Over the course of the next 40 years, the car was driven and shown around its adopted home of Ohio and occasionally at larger shows in the Northeast United States, including at the Meadowbrook Concours d’Elegance and the Ferrari Club of America’s annual meet at Watkins Glen in 1990. Utmost care was always taken by the current owner to preserve the remarkably original condition of the car, and as a result, it shows very well and has simply never needed to be restored. The interior and seats remain in excellent original condition, with a charming, slight patina that is only achieved through years of careful use and is impossible to recreate.
Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti 1965

The alloy-bodied 275 GTBs are considered by many to be the most desirable variant of the 275 GTB, as they hold a close link to Ferraris competition cars, and they are also one of the rarest, as fewer than 60 road versions were built. Chassis 08069 is a wonderful example of a highly original alloy-bodied 275 GTB. Even though 275 GTBs have become more desirable to collectors in recent years, alloy-bodied examples have always been in high demand, and they rarely come up for sale.

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957 - World Of Classic Cars -

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957

Just as it had been a massive success on race tracks around Europe and North America, the 300 SL proved to be a victory for the company in its dealerships around the world. U.S. importer Max Hoffman believed that a street-legal version of the W194 Coupe would sell well in the United States, and he convinced the top brass at Mercedes-Benz to produce a road going version. Upon the car’s premier at the 1954 New York Auto Show, it was clear that Hoffman was right, as the car caused nothing short of a fanfare. With the world’s most advanced sports car chassis and powertrain laying underneath gorgeous bodywork, it was quite difficult for many well-heeled enthusiasts to not write a check and place an order on the spot.
But Hoffman had higher hopes for the already successful 300 SL Gullwing. He believed that a convertible version of the 300 SL would bring even more buyers to his dealership, as they were now lusting after a car that would not only give them world-beating performance but also a chance to let the wind flow through their hair. Other manufacturers were successfully selling convertible sports cars throughout America, and Hoffman wanted his own piece of that market.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957

In production, the convertible remained largely similar to the coupe, albeit with a few minor changes. In order to support conventionally hinged doors, the space-frame chassis had to be lowered, which also allowed for greater ease of entry into the more elegant convertible. Cosmetic changes included new headlights, a smaller opening in the front grille, and dual chrome strips that were affixed to the side sills, giving the roadster a more streamlined look.
Several mechanical updates were also introduced in order to keep up with the competition. The rear suspension was fine-tuned by the repositioning of the single-pivot rear swing axle and the installation of a coil spring mounted transversely above the differential. As the roadster was linked to the two axle halves by a vertical strut, which allowed engineers to install softer rear springs, it boasted a more comfortable ride and improved handling over its coupe predecessor. While these revisions added an additional 250 pounds, the roadster also received a healthy boost in horsepower. All roadsters produced were outfitted with the more sporting NSL engine from the coupe as standard configuration. Depending on the final drive ratio specified by the buyer, the roadster was capable of top speeds ranging from 133 to 155 mph.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957

Nineteen fifty-seven marked both the first year of production for the 300 SL Roadsters and the last year of production for the gullwing. The final 70 gullwings were produced in the first five months of that year, and 618 roadsters were produced in the roadster’s inaugural year, more than any other year in terms of roadster production. By the end of the production run in 1953, 1,858 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadsters had been produced, over 400 more than the gullwing, speaking to the car’s commercial success.
This car, chassis 7500666, was produced in 1957 and outfitted with the special-order exterior paint of Hellgrun (274 G) over a cream leather interior, which was a subtle yet highly attractive color combination. Like many 300 SLs, it is believed that this 1957 Roadster was delivered through Max Hoffman’s distributorship in New York City. Bob Pond purchased this 300 SL from The Fine Car Store in San Diego, California, on November 17, 1991, and traded in a 1967 Aston Martin DB6 at the same time. At the time of purchase, it was reported to have only had a single owner, a Marland G. Langley Jr. of Concord, New Hampshire, and it was still fitted with its original Becker Mexico radio and Michelin tires.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957

The paint still has a splendid shine, and while the cream leather interior is starting to show its age, it is still a lovely place to be in for a drive. Quaker State service record stickers affixed to the inside of the driver’s side door show the intervals at which the car had oil changes, corroborating with the current reading of the odometer. 
Even 50 years after the last example left the factory, the 300 SL Roadster is still respected as one of the most incredible production cars ever produced. Its performance is still considered suitable, even by today’s standards, and many are still driven enthusiastically by their owners in vintage tours and rallies. 

Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti 1964 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti 1964

Few motor cars in the world possess such intrinsic desirability that their availability at auction sends shockwaves through the community of automotive enthusiasts around the world; fewer still are so exceptionally rare, fast, and achingly beautiful that they attain legendary status. These select few motor cars, at the highest point on the capstone of the collector car pyramid, represent the benchmark from which all superlatives in automotive history are born. They are, quite inarguably, the most important cars in the world.
Even within this exclusive group, 06701 stands out among its peers. Without even considering its almost unbelievable rarity, its matching numbers, its breathtaking design, or the pedigree of its family tree, it not only counts the 250 GTO series among its brothers but, more immediately, the two other 275 GTB/C Speciales, successors to the GTO, neither of which are likely to ever come up for sale and one of which holds a record that remains unbroken at Le Mans after a half century!

THE GTO ’65
Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti 1964

The era into which 06701 was born saw Ferrari not only dominate endurance racing but experience a serious challenge from the American Ford-powered teams in both the prototype and GT classes. The all-conquering 250 GTO had won the GT class three years in a row, and Ferrari’s P-series of sports prototype racing cars were exceptionally formidable as well, but Carroll Shelby’s Cobra Daytonas and the persistent development of the Ford GT40 always had the gentlemen from Maranello looking in their rearview mirrors.
Ferrari knew it had a chance for victory in 1965 with a new competition-ready version of its 275 GTB, which was to be released at the Paris Motor Show in October of 1964. As the first Ferrari with an independent rear suspension and a transaxle gearbox, it was a major improvement over the outgoing 250-series and a superb evolution of the front-engined 250 GTO.
Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti 1964

During late 1964 and early 1965, Ferrari built three 275 GTB/C Speciales, specifically for FIA homologation and factory development, each boasting unique details from the standard 275 GTB/Cs that would follow. All were fitted with super-lightweight aluminum bodywork, a Tipo 563 chassis constructed of smaller and lighter tubes, and the type 213/Comp dry-sump engine topped with six Weber carburetors first seen in the 250 LM, which was mounted lower in the chassis to lower the car’s center of gravity. This engine was specifically developed with big valves and cylinder heads, like the 250 GTO or 250 LM, 9.7:1 compression ratio pistons, the already well-tested Tipo 130 camshaft (10mm lift), and most of the auxiliary casings made in magnesium. With 70 additional horsepower powering a chassis that was lighter in all respects to the standard 275 GTB road car, this was undoubtedly the most formidable weapon in Ferrari’s competition arsenal. As Giancarlo Rosetti stated in his Forza article entitled “Legend of the GTO ’65,” “while the GTB/C Speciales were built on 275 chassis and fitted with 3.3-liter motors, it’s easy to see where they evolved from.”
Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti 1964

Completed in April 1965, chassis 06701, present here, was the first of the three 275 GTB/C Speciales built. It uniquely hand built in all respects, as were the two cars that followed. As per the build sheet, the car was originally fitted with a 250 LM type exhaust with side pipes. Its rear fender shared a very similar profile with the ’64 250 GTOs, as did its front end, which also bore some resemblance to that of a 330 LMB. For added ventilation to the brakes, two oval slots were cut in the nose and another three vents behind the rear wheels. Additionally, the car features an outside aluminum fuel filler cap, specific to the 140-liter fuel tank, to allow for faster fueling during pit stops and a stunningly sculpted air-intake on the hood. Inside, a pair of GTO-style aluminum bucket seats holds both driver and passenger firmly in position.
Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti 1964

All told, Ferrari had arranged a powerful arsenal for Le Mans. The 275 GTB/C would ideally run in the GT class and the 250 LM in the prototype class. They were determined to dominate not just one but both categories.
With the FIA still incensed from Ferrari’s attempts to incorrectly homologate the 250 GTO and 250 LM, however, the 275 GTB/C Speciales were not granted homologation, as the car submitted was considerably under the dry weight stated for the road-going 275 GTB in Ferrari’s own sales literature. Determined to see the car compete, Ferrari offered to accept homologation at the weight stated for the road-going 275 GTB, but the FIA refused and Ferrari decided that it would not compete in the 1965 season in the GT class. Eventually, both sides would reach a compromise by June of 1965, but only chassis 06885 would see competitive action during that season. Although its racing career was brief, 06885 quickly proved the potency of the Speciales, finishing an incredible third overall at the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans, a record that has stood ever since as the best finish by a front-engined car.
Ferrari 275 GTBC Speciale by Scaglietti 1964

Chassis 06701, meanwhile, was sold directly from the factory to Pietro Ferraro of Trieste, Italy, in May of 1965, who registered it on the plate “TS 75946” and proceeded to use the car exclusively on the road. It was registered to Cartiere del Timavo, his paper producing company. Prior to the car’s sale, it is believed that the car’s exterior color was changed by the factory from its original Rosso Cina to Grigio Scurro Metalizatto. Furthermore, the factory also fitted front half bumpers and full rear bumpers, indicating that the car would be used by its first private owner on the road.
Ferraro passed the car to Alessandro Gregori in 1969, and around this time the car had gained a silver band over its grey paint. Gregori owned the car for just two months but registered it in Vicenza with the registration “VI 167868” for further road use. Chassis 06701 then traveled to the United Kingdom, where it was sold to Colonel E.B. Wilson of London, who then passed the car to long-term owner Michel Pobrejeski of Boulogne-Billancourt, who retained the car for 25 years. Within about the first decade of its life, three GTO style nose vents were cut into the bodywork, in order to provide better ventilation to the engine—a welcome improvement to the car, as demonstrated at the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans where the mechanics of Ecurie Francorchamps cut a progressively wider cooling inlet in the bonnet of 06885 over the course of the race. At that time, Pobrejeski also had the car repainted red.
Ferrari 275 GTBC Speciale by Scaglietti 1964

Respected Ferrari collector Brandon Wang would be the next owner of 06701, and he immediately decided to campaign the car in historic events. He entered it in the International Historic Festival at Goodwood and later at Tutte Le Ferrari in Mugello. Chassis 06701 proved to be highly competitive, and in an article written about the car in Cavallino (issue 110), Ferrari historian Keith Bluemel specifically mentioned its outing at Goodwood, stating that, “If a parallel could be drawn with its performance in the race to what it might have achieved during the 1965 season, then it would have been a very competitive package.” The following year, the car took to the Nürburgring for the Ferrari Racing Days and Shell Historic Challenge. In Mr. Wang’s ownership, the car was also shown at the VIII Automobiles Classiques Louis Vuitton Concours d’Elegance in Paris.
Ferrari 275 GTBC Speciale by Scaglietti 1964

In 1997, while still in the ownership of Brandon Wang, 06701 was driven on the Tour Auto by Derek Hill with his father and 1961 Formula One World Champion Phil Hill riding along as navigator. Wang decided to restore the car upon its return, opting to refinish the car in its highly attractive two-tone silver and grey color scheme that the car wore earlier in its life.
Following the completion of the restoration in 1998, the car was purchased by another noted collector and was displayed at the FCA National Concours in Los Angeles in May of 2002. The year 2005 brought about two more public appearances for 06701, and it was displayed at the 14th Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach in January and was on the track at Laguna Seca for the Monterey Historic Races in August. Since then, 06701 has been carefully preserved by its current owner, who, like his predecessors, is a connoisseur of other fine, rare automobiles.

RARITY IN THE EXTREME
Ferrari 275 GTBC Speciale by Scaglietti 1964

Notwithstanding the 275 GTB/C’s extraordinary racing capability and bespoke scuderia Ferrari character, 06701 is a car whose inclusion in these pages will almost certainly never happen again, particularly since its two sister cars are very unlikely to become available. Chassis 06885 has been owned since 1970 by noted enthusiast Preston Henn, who has clearly stated that he intends to continue enjoying the jewel of his collection, which some enthusiasts speculate may be the first motor car of any kind to sell for the magic “nine-figure” mark, should it ever become available. The third and final car of the series, chassis 07185, is also part of a prominent private collection and is likewise very unlikely to be sold in the near future. This, then, renders 06701 the only opportunity to acquire this unbelievably rare evolution of the GTO concept, the 275 GTB/C Speciale—a model whose brief stint at Le Mans proved so dominant that its record stands to this day. It is a model so attractive, so fast, so rare, and so superior in every respect that it may rightfully be considered one of the most important cars in the world.

marți, 21 octombrie 2014

Alfa Romeo 1900C Super Sprint Coupe by Ghia 1954 - World Of Classic Cars -

Alfa Romeo 1900C Super Sprint Coupe by Ghia 1954

The 1900 was Alfa Romeo’s first post-war production model, and it showed the direction that the Milan-based company would take in the coming decades. The 1900 was smaller and more compact than the pre-war designed 6C 2500, and it was powered by an iron-block and aluminum-head four-cylinder with chain-driven dual overhead camshafts. It was introduced as a sedan in 1950, and a year later, the sedan was followed by the more sporting 1900C Sprint Coupe, which rode on a five-inch shorter wheelbase. Alfa continued to extract more power from the two-liter engine, which culminated into 115 horsepower for the SS (Super Sprint).
Alfa Romeo 1900C Super Sprint Coupe by Ghia 1954

The 1900 was Alfa Romeo’s first car to utilize unit-body construction, which made it more difficult for Italy’s coachbuilders to practice their creativity, but not impossible, and a variety of one-off and limited-production designs from Bertone, Ghia, Touring, and Pinin Farina demonstrated the capabilities of these now legendary artisans.
The 1900 Super Sprint shown here was designed by Giovanni Savonuzzi for renowned Italian coachbuilder Ghia, and it reflects many of the advanced aerodynamic ideas that Savonuzzi was developing at the time, including the trend-setting Gilda concept.
Alfa Romeo 1900C Super Sprint Coupe by Ghia 1954

Ghia is known to have built a series of similar bodies on the 1900 SS, with each subtly different from the next. This one features headlights that “hang” inside a larger fender opening that resembles an air intake, which was a theme that Savonuzzi and Ghia would further explore in the designs for Chrysler’s Turbine car. The front bumper is also believed to be unique, as it was a design proposed by Ghia for the original Karmann Ghia Type 3 Coupe. The interior features a Nardi steering wheel and floor-shift linkage, and the 1900 SS rides on lightweight Borrani alloy-rim wire wheels.
Alfa Romeo 1900C Super Sprint Coupe by Ghia 1954

This 1900 SS was restored some time ago, believed around 1995, and reportedly, it has more recently undergone a comprehensive engine overhaul, which included the addition of new brakes, radiator, and clutch. The car is currently in fine, drivable condition. This is a rare and significant special-bodied Alfa Romeo of quality and style.

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II by Pininfarina 1966 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II by Pininfarina 1966

As Enzo Ferrari sought to update his lucrative grand touring coupe lineup, the 330 was conceived as a successor to his marque’s legendary and long-lived 250 series.
While Ferrari’s efforts primarily remained centered around racing cars, it was the sale of road going models to well-heeled, discerning customers that financed those efforts. This symbiotic relationship was obvious once one opened the hood of the first 330, the 330 America. The company’s new Tipo 209 V-12 engine displaced 3,967 cubic centimeters (330 cubic centimeters per cylinder, which gave the car its name) and boasted a slightly longer block than its 400 SA series predecessor. The engine was rated at 300 horsepower, and the 12 cylinders were fed by a trio of Weber 40 DCZ/6 carburetors. Befitting of the car’s highway cruising aim, the 330 used a four-speed gearbox with an overdrive unit.
Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II by Pininfarina 1966

The 330 America was, however, a short-lived placeholder for what was to come: the 330 GT 2+2. It was introduced in January 1964 at the Brussels Motor Show, where it generated a high degree of controversy for its quad-headlamp arrangement, which was penned by Pininfarina’s noted American designer Tom Tjaarda. Although today’s enthusiasts find its mid-century look to be distinctive, it was subsequently replaced with a more conventional twin-headlamp arrangement a year later, when the Series II hit the market.
Regardless of the number of eyebrows raised by the 330 GT 2+2’s styling, it was undoubtedly a “grander” tourer for Ferrari. The 330 rode on a wheelbase that was two inches longer than the 250 GTE, and it included such advanced engineering features as Koni adjustable shock absorbers and a Dunlop dual-circuit braking system that gave both the front disc and rear disc brakes their own servo-assist. A true five-speed gearbox arrived in 1965, which replaced the overdrive unit. Only 455 examples of the handsome Series II 330 GT were built before the more aggressive yet less stately 365 GT arrived in 1967.
Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II by Pininfarina 1966

The car shown here, chassis number 09089, is an original U.S.-delivery example that was built with power windows, instrumentation in miles, and factory air conditioning. It was originally finished in Amaranto (19379) with a Beige leather (VM 3218) interior and black carpets. After being completed by the factory in October 1966, it was shipped from Livorno, Italy, to New York aboard the S.S. Pia Costa. Upon arrival, it was sold by importer Luigi Chinetti Motors to a Mr. Kabalck, a New York resident who was a good, long-time customer of Chinetti’s, having earlier purchased a 342 America.
Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II by Pininfarina 1966

After being sold in 1983, the car was acquired in 1987 by Dennis Ravallese, of Wayne, New Jersey, in whose ownership it would spend over 20 years. It was eventually acquired by the present owner, whose personal shop oversaw the fresh restoration that it presently wears. The body was stripped to bare metal and refinished in its original color. As the owner notes, the interior had been reupholstered some time earlier, and it was done to such a high standard, and in the original color, that he decided to leave it as-is. The engine was removed, fully serviced to operate well, and then reinstalled. All chrome, stainless trim, and the Borrani wire wheels have been replated to a high standard, and new, correct Michelin tires were mounted.

Rolls-Royce Phantom V Sedanca de Ville by James Young 1960 - World Of Classic Cars -

Rolls-Royce Phantom V Sedanca de Ville by James Young 1960

After building a mere 18 Phantom IV chassis strictly for ruling heads of state, Rolls-Royce turned back to offering a Phantom to the merely very wealthy for 1959. The Phantom V was based on an all-new chassis design and included a new V-8 engine, the same as in the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II; a Hydra-Matic automatic transmission; and servo-assisted braking. It was a tremendously expensive automobile that was produced solely to individual special-order. As on earlier Rolls-Royces, the tradition of bespoke custom coachwork continued, with the world’s few remaining coachbuilders turning out ash forms that were skinned in aluminum and finished in the owner’s choice of paint colors and trim.
Rolls-Royce Phantom V Sedanca de Ville by James Young 1960

Most desirable of the Phantom Vs are the bodies produced by James Young Ltd. At the time of the Phantom V’s production, H.J. Mulliner and Park Ward, James Young’s two main competitors, were both essentially (and later actually) owned by Rolls-Royce. Thus, the bodies they produced for the Phantom V eventually became “factory” bodies that were produced along the same basic lines and in relatively large numbers. Meanwhile, James Young continued to offer the same fully custom roster as before, with numerous unique styles to suit virtually any taste or use.
Rolls-Royce Phantom V Sedanca de Ville by James Young 1960

Among these was style number PV22SD, which was based on style number PV22, a sleek and popular touring limousine with graceful lines that minimized its size. “SD” refers to the sliding roof, which when open transforms this style into an open-drive town car, or, in Rolls-Royce parlance, a sedanca de Ville. By the early 1960s, popularity of this incredibly elegant style had waned, as most owners preferred to drive themselves. Yet, enough of a tiny market existed for James Young to continue to offer the style. The seven examples of style number PV22SD produced would be the final sedanca de Villes built on Rolls-Royce chassis. Among formal Phantom Vs, they are the most seldom sold, meriting the highest respect and often commanding the highest price.
Rolls-Royce Phantom V Sedanca de Ville by James Young 1960

The car presented here, chassis number 5AS95, may well be the most unique of those seven automobiles. It was ordered at a cost equivalent to $8,764 American dollars, for the chassis only, at a time when the average annual income in the United States was $5,100 and the average new car was $2,275. Simply put, once its James Young body had been fitted, this was undoubtedly one of the most expensive automobiles in the world. Then again, its original owner, Count Locan, who was also a collector of fine art, was known among his peers as a man who sought the best of everything, and, therefore, he spared no expense when ordering his new Rolls-Royce.
Rolls-Royce Phantom V Sedanca de Ville by James Young 1960

The rear compartment of this car is utterly commodious, as it features a sumptuous sofa upholstered in the finest beige West of England wool broadcloth. Across from the sofa and above a sea of fitted Wilton wool carpeting is burled walnut cabinetry. In fact, the entire compartment is surrounded by magnificent, rich burled walnut. The count specified that within the cabinetry there should be an exquisitely crafted cocktail bar filled with lead crystal decanters and flanked by folding picnic trays to support beverages and other refreshments. A pair of folding opera seats is provided, for the occasional carriage of servants or extra guests, while the main seat itself is fully adjustable, forwards and backwards, with the touch of a switch, and it faces a pair of carpeted hassock-style footrests.
Rolls-Royce Phantom V Sedanca de Ville by James Young 1960

The body was finished in gleaming Mason’s Black and embellished with “canework.” This feature was commonly applied to formal town cars during the 1910s and 1920s, as owners made the often difficult transition from carriage to automobile and wanted cars that resembled horse-drawn broughams. Accordingly, bodies were paneled in handmade caning, which eventually evolved into canework, which was essentially thickened paint painstakingly hand-applied in a very narrow crosshatch pattern while the body laid on its side. It was something of the automotive equivalent to hand-stitching lace, and it was an incredibly tedious, challenging process; today, it’s nearly a lost art. It lost popularity following World War II, but for gentlemen like Count Locan, it was a necessary touch of dignified elegance.
Rolls-Royce Phantom V Sedanca de Ville by James Young 1960

Outside of the high-roof “Canberra” Phantom Vs hand-built for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth I, perhaps no Phantom V was as opulently fitted-out or as exquisitely finished as this spectacular Sedanca de Ville.
The car’s ownership history is fully documented by the Rolls-Royce Foundation and Rolls-Royce Enthusiasts’ Club, and their paperwork indicates that the Phantom V found its second owner in London in 1965. It was subsequently acquired by an esteemed Rolls-Royce specialist in California and was brought stateside in his hands in 1974. Since that time, it has benefitted from careful refurbishment and maintenance at the hands of marque specialists. In addition to all of the necessary mechanical maintenance and adjustments and the replating of the brightwork, the interior’s wood trim has been refinished and correct Wilton carpets were fitted. Furthermore, 5AS95 is featured on the cover of Lawrence Dalton’s respected marque text, Rolls-Royce: The Classic Elegance. A factory drawing of body style PV22SD, which this car wears, is also depicted on page 282.
Rolls-Royce Phantom V Sedanca de Ville by James Young 1960

Count Locan’s Phantom V ranks among the last truly custom, one-of-a-kind Rolls-Royces, and it marks the end of an era for automobiles that are truly a reflection of the opulent tastes of their original owners.