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joi, 30 octombrie 2014

Porsche 911 2.0 Coupe 1965 - World Of Classic Cars -

Porsche 911 2.0 Coupe 1965

The new six-cylinder 911, conceived as the successor to the much-loved four-cylinder 356 series, was unveiled at the Frankfurt Auto Show (as was the 901) in the fall of 1963, and it went into series production one year later. It remains, after 50 years, one of the purest automotive designs in history.
This early short-wheelbase 911 was special-ordered in Bali Blue (6412) with a Black Leatherette B interior, and it left the factory as such on May 6, 1965. According to its Certificate of Authenticity, only a single feature was specified, a Webasto gas heater (01 243). The car was delivered to Ben Pons’ Automobielhandel in Amersfoort, Holland, the first VW and Porsche franchise outside of Germany.
Porsche 911 2.0 Coupe 1965

While its earliest provenance is unknown, the car eventually made its way to the U.S. There, its first American owners are known to have been a couple in Southern California, according to a registration certificate issued on April 30, 1987. The car then passed through at least one additional owner before landing in the hands of well-known Los Angeles Porsche collector Magnus Walker in the summer of 2009.
By then, its original engine had been replaced, although its original Type 901 transaxle remained with the chassis. The current owners had been looking for a 1965 911 in Bali Blue for some time, and in late 2010, they learned that such a car was available from Walker. After being purchased in early 2011, chassis 301036 was duly shipped to its new home in Europe. The buyers immediately began what would become a comprehensive, two-year restoration by a top European restorer.
Porsche 911 2.0 Coupe 1965

A key part of the project was their search for a correct 901/01 engine. At around that same time, a member of the Early 911 S Registry posted an advertisement offering a series-correct two-liter engine, case number 901133, for sale. As luck would have it, the engine was the very same that had been removed from 301036 earlier in its life. That case number caught Walker’s eye, and he immediately contacted the car’s new owners. In June 2012, the engine was reunited with its original chassis.
The current owner states that while some rust repair was necessary, 90 percent of the body panels and tub remain original, including the early-type rockers, the glass, and the chrome-plated brass window frames. The body was then finished using the KTL electrostatic coating process, to protect it from future corrosion. Along with the body and suspension, both the engine and gearbox were completely rebuilt. A fresh interior with correct six-pleat houndstooth cloth and a period-correct leatherette that had been sourced from a Porsche Classic authorized supplier was installed. Additionally, all the instruments in the early-type dashboard were rebuilt, and the odometer was reset to zero. Finally, this beautiful early 911 was fitted with chromed steel wheels that are mounted with new Vredestein Sprint Classic tires

Ferrari F310 B 1997 - World Of Classic Cars -

FIFTY YEARS OF FERRARI
Ferrari F310 B 1997

Nineteen ninety-seven was a landmark year for the Scuderia, as it marked the company’s 50th anniversary, and it had quite a lot to celebrate. Motorsport, especially Formula One, had always been near and dear to the company’s heart. It was through its success in Formula One that Ferrari was catapulted from relative obscurity in its early days to becoming one of the most respected and recognizable automotive brands on the planet. Other manufacturers had come and gone from the sport, but Ferrari was always a constant presence at the front of the starting grid.
By 1997, Ferrari’s road car division was enjoying unbridled success, particularly with the launch of the F1-style gearbox management system in the F355 F1, which inextricably linked Ferrari’s road cars with the F1 program. Ferrari, not a company willing to dwell on its past laurels, was constantly looking to the future for inspiration and technological development in order to win its next World Championship, and the Prancing Horse wanted to arrive in the 21st century at the top of the podium.
Ferrari F310 B 1997

In terms of Formula One, 1997 was perceived by many to be a building year for Ferrari. This would be Ross Brawn’s first season as the technical director and Rory Byrne’s first season as the chief designer, under the guidance of Jean Todt. Michael Schumacher, now in his second year with the Scuderia, had finished 1st on three separate occasions in 1996, and the team was eager to see both Schumacher and fellow driver Eddie Irvine on the podium more frequently in 1997.
The F310 B was still equipped with the 730-horsepower, 3.0-liter V-10 engine that Ferrari introduced with the F310 in 1996, but it was further refined and developed from lessons learned in the previous season and was subsequently given the factory designation of Type 046/2.
Ferrari F310 B 1997

Ferrari’s V-10 Formula One engines are known for their high-revving nature and glorious exhaust note, which is a sound that has always been enjoyed by spectators in the grandstands of race tracks all over the world, but to the person sitting behind the wheel, it is a beautiful symphony.
Despite its otherworldly performance, the F310 B is considered to be rather docile when compared to Formula One cars of past. The F310 B was included in the 1997/1998 issue of Autocourse, where John Barnard stated that he designed the car to be “easy to drive, stable, and consistent” on the race track, making it an excellent choice for a newcomer to the world of Formula One racing and quite easy to handle for those already used to such high-strung machines.

CHASSIS NUMBER 179
Ferrari F310 B 1997

The F310 B presented here, chassis number 179, is the second to last example built, and it is the first of just two lighter-specification examples constructed with a slightly higher fuel capacity than the first models. The car made its first appearance at the Belgian Grand Prix at Spa, with none other than Michael Schumacher behind the wheel. However, as Schumacher was used to the heavier iteration of the car, he struggled to find a setup that he liked and thus reverted to the older-spec car, to finish 3rd in qualifying. For the race, chassis 179 was set up for dry-weather conditions. Unfortunately, the race began in a torrential downpour, so Schumacher decided to race the same car he qualified in.
Ferrari F310 B 1997

The car’s next appearance was in the following round of the Championship, at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza on September 7. This time, it was Irvine that found himself behind the wheel of chassis 179, finishing 10th in qualifying and moving up two positions to finish 8th overall in the grand prix itself. Irvine retained the car for the Austrian Grand Prix two weeks later, where he qualified 8th but failed to finish. Williams emerged victorious with the constructors’ title at the end of the season, while Schumacher remained in the running for the Drivers’ Championship all the way up until the final race of the season, which is a testament to the potential of the F310 B.
Ferrari F310 B 1997

Following its retirement from professional racing, chassis 179 left Ferrari’s stable in 1999, and since then, it has had a documented history in the ownership of a small group of prominent collectors. Over the years, it has been seen at several motorsport events, including at Ferrari Racing Days at the Hockenheimring in Germany in 2000 and at the Monterey Historic Races at Laguna Seca in 2004. Additionally, the car has been a frequent sight at Ferrari’s popular F1 Clienti events.
In 2003, Ferrari’s F1 Clienti Department was created in order to support owners of Ferrari F1 racers by facilitating events where clients can drive their cars at speed on some of the race tracks where they were campaigned when new. Additionally, the factory supplies their own trained technicians to help maintain and monitor the cars at the events. Customers can also opt to store and service their cars at the factory, if they so desire. Chassis 179 has attended many F1 Clienti events following its retirement from professional racing, and it would surely be welcome at future events.
Ferrari F310 B 1997

Furthermore, it is important to note that this car has been granted Ferrari Classiche certification, which certifies that it is as factory-correct as it was when it was campaigned by Schumacher and Irvine in 1997.
Not only is the F310 B a symbol of Ferrari’s 50-year pursuit of success in motorsport, it is also a remarkable example of automotive technology. In terms of Formula One history, it marks the beginning of a series of vehicles that brought Ferrari and Michael Schumacher multiple World Championship titles, making Schumacher the winningest Formula One driver of all time, in an era that many will fondly remember. Even though chassis 179 left the world stage 17 years ago, it still provides an endless amount of thrills to both driver and spectators.

miercuri, 29 octombrie 2014

Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953

As the first Ferrari to carry the now legendary 250 series nomenclature, the 250 Europa marked the beginning of a wonderful time in Ferrari’s history. It was revealed to the public, alongside the 375 America, at the 1953 Paris Auto Salon, and it would be Ferrari’s first true grand touring automobile, showing that the company was willing to produce cars for well-heeled customers who were looking to drive their Ferraris on the road rather than on the track.
In addition to being the first car of the 250 series, the Europa is unique amongst other members of its family for being the only one to carry the Aurelio Lampredi-designed V-12.
Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953

This engine, which was used in previous racing Ferraris, could produce over 200 horsepower and was capable of propelling its chassis and coachbuilt bodywork at speeds in excess of 135 mph.
Its coachwork was just as striking as the performance of the Europa itself, as it was designed and fabricated by Pinin Farina. The company was finally coming into its own in the early 1950s, and it was beginning to establish both a look and feel for the Ferrari bodies they were manufacturing. Pinin Farina’s design for the Europa proved to be a perfect blend of sportiness and elegance, which wonderfully represented the car’s personality.

BUILT FOR A FRIEND OF THE HOUSE
Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953

Chassis 0305 EU was the fourth Europa of a total of twenty-one units constructed. It arrived at Pinin Farina’s premises on September 29, 1953, according to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, and it was finished in Rosso Marrone, with a beige chiaro roof and beige sills. The interior was finished in Marrone leather and had a matching beige cloth. The exterior, which was shod with whitewall tires, featured one unusual feature, the gas tank lid was placed on the driver’s side rear three-quarter panel, whereas in other Europas it could only be accessed through the trunk. The day before Christmas Eve 1953, the bodywork was invoiced by Pinin Farina, and the chassis was sold new to its first owner, Magnolfi Latino of Florence, the son of Italian industrialist Giovanni Latino, on March 15, 1954.
Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953

Magnolfi was friends with Pinin Farina himself and must have seen ownership of this Europa as an excellent opportunity to showcase his friend’s craftsmanship, as evidenced by the unusual placement of the Pinin Farina logo, just above the Ferrari emblem, on the Europa’s nose. Magnolfi showed the car at two separate Italian concours events in his first year of ownership, at the Concorso Satorie Romana in Rome and at the Primo Raduno Mondiale della Carrozzeria at Villa Ormond in San Remo. Additionally, he drove the car on the 1954 Rallye du Cinéma in San Remo. It can be argued that the appearances of this car at period concours events helped to establish Pinin Farina’s “Ferrari look” not with Enzo but with the general public, as well as with those that would be lucky enough to become a Ferrari customer in the near future.
Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953

Sadly, once 0305 EU made its way across the Atlantic, its history becomes murky. Its original engine was replaced with a Chevrolet V-8, the fate of many early U.S.-bound Ferraris, as replacement parts for Italian motors were often difficult to find or too expensive to source. After leaving its chassis, the engine was reported to be with Basil Shadlun in Howell, New Jersey, while the Europa itself was making its way across the lower 48, residing with an owner in Kansas and then moving to sunny California.
By the 1990s, the Europa made its way back to its native Italy and passed through a pair of subsequent European owners before being purchased by an individual residing in the Netherlands, who completely dismantled the car in order to take inventory of the parts present for a future restoration. That specific restoration never began, and the car was passed to its current Belgian collector in 2006.
Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953

With all parts largely accounted for, with the exception of an engine, gearbox, and rear axle, its new owner decided it was time to bring 0305 EU back to its former glory after so many years out of the limelight. Obviously, the first order of business would be to source a correct and original Lampredi V-12 to serve as the car’s new powerplant.

REDISCOVERING ENGINE 0305 EU, AGAINST ALL ODDS

The search for an acceptable engine began in 2007, and it was not successful until 2009, when an engine, numbered 0337 AL, was found in largely neglected condition. The engine was missing its carburetors and had clearly not been run for some time, but it was largely intact. After some deliberation, it was finally determined that this unit would be acceptable for chassis 0305 EU.
Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953

Upon further inspection, an incredible discovery was made! Underneath the engine stamping on the block, another engine number was visible, and it appeared to be 0305 EU! To confirm the true identity of this engine, it was sent to Ferrari Classiche for further inspection of the engine itself and its internal numbers. Ferrari noted the internal number as 076, which, against all odds, matched the number listed in Ferrari’s own archives as indeed belonging to the chassis from which it was sourced! Ferrari restamped the correct number into the block and sent the engine back to the Belgium, where it would be reunited with its original chassis after a long absence. Once the engine and chassis were reunited, the car was entrusted to the Schouwenburg brothers at Strada e Corsa, who coordinated the restoration of the body, electrical components, and the interior and worked on the suspension, engine, and transmission in Italy.

TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO THE SHOW FIELD
Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953

Following its five-year restoration, which resulted in nearly 4,000 hours of work, its owner decided that 0305 EU would embark on its second tour of Europe’s most prestigious concours events. It premiered at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in July 2013 as part of the Cartier Style et Luxe Concours, and then, in October of that year, it was shown once more in Knokke-le-Zoute, Belgium, at the Zoute Concours d’Elegance, where it earned First in Class.
Perhaps the biggest piece of publicity for this fantastic Europa was when it was featured on the cover of Cavallino issue 198 in December 2013/January 2014 and was given a 10-page article written by Hugo Garritsen within. Earlier this summer, 0305 EU was invited to the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, where it definitely made a strong impression on the judges, as it took home First in Class honors.
Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina 1953

Chassis 0305 EU is undoubtedly one of the finest 250 Europas in existence, and it will now finally be able to relive its youth, as it has been reunited with its original engine. It would be welcome at any concours event around the globe, and it has already proven that it is capable of earning trophies to its name. As the 250 Europa is Ferrari and Pinin Farina’s original expression of the grand touring automobile, any Ferrari collection would be incomplete without a one.

Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I Drophead Coupe by James Young 1959 - World Of Classic Cars -

Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I Drophead Coupe by James Young 1959

In 1955, the long-awaited Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I was introduced and enthusiastically accepted by eager buyers. The Silver Cloud I combined the best of old-world tradition with modern processes, as it was the final Rolls-Royce model to be powered by the reliable inline six-cylinder engine, yet it could also be had with full modern “standard steel saloon” bodywork, which was beautifully proportioned and cost far less than a coachbuilt car. In fact, of the 15,414 Silver Cloud chassis—Series I through III—produced between 1955 and 1965, fewer than 200 were outfitted with custom coachwork, and even fewer of these were truly “unique” designs.
Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I Drophead Coupe by James Young 1959

Among the most prominent and prestigious coachbuilders for the Silver Cloud was James Young Ltd., of Bromley, Kent. This renowned shop, which was established in 1863, survived for 104 years and was known for its distinctive, instantly recognizable detailing, which included unique door handles and graceful body moldings. Following 1937, the firm worked almost exclusively on Rolls-Royce and Bentley chassis, as it had been acquired by prominent London dealer Jack Barclay that year. It would survive and produce fine coaches until 1967.
Eight Silver Cloud I chassis were bodied by James Young as drophead coupes, and of these, seven were four-passenger cars. This car, chassis number LSJF202, was the only example built as a two-passenger design. As a two-passenger design on such a long chassis would have seemed rather awkwardly proportioned, James Young utilized the same basic design as for the four-passenger model, but he replaced the rear seat with additional space for luggage.
Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I Drophead Coupe by James Young 1959

The car was bodied in lightweight aluminum alloy that was reinforced with steel, and it was equipped with practically every optional item available in 1959, as well as a few extras. Car radios still weren’t commonplace in 1950s Europe, but this car has one, as well as power steering, power windows, and even a power-operated radio antenna, with the latter being installed by James Young. Also specified were Le Mans-type “24” headlamps, high-frequency horns with a muting switch, an export-type rear number plate, a fitted suitcase, chrome-plated disc wheel covers, and a speedometer reading in kilometers. The interior was painstakingly stitched together from vat-dyed Connolly leather hides, and matching tan carpets were fitted with the finest British Wilton wool. Burled Circassian walnut veneers define the fascia, trim, and door sills. Naturally, with the “L” prefix on its chassis number, it was originally equipped with left-hand drive, and it still retains this most desirable feature today.
Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I Drophead Coupe by James Young 1959

The completed Silver Cloud I was delivered through the Garage de l’Athénée, of Geneva, Switzerland, to Count François de Salverte, a prominent socialite and expert in Louis XVI furniture, on April 11, 1958. After being acquired by its second owner and shipped to the United States, this one-off Drophead Coupe received a concours-quality restoration, which was performed by leading Rolls-Royce specialists. The body was finished in the creamy white known as Magnolia to Rolls-Royce enthusiasts, and it featured a correct, heavily padded tan cloth top and fitted tonneau cover, resulting in a sensational appearance. With its blank rear quarters, the raised top gives the car an unusually sporty air.

Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina 1966 - World Of Classic Cars -

THE 275 GTS
Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina 1966

Ferrari’s 275 GTS, intended as a replacement for the 250 GT Series II Cabriolet, was premiered alongside its closed sibling, the 275 GTB, at the 1964 Paris Auto Show. While both cars looked remarkably different on the outside, they both bore similar 3.3-liter Colombo V-12s, chassis, and suspensions underneath. The 275 GTS was largely intended for the American market, as Ferrari convertibles had sold well in climates like California and Florida, where the attractiveness and marketability of a high-performance grand touring cabriolet had long been established.
While the 275 GTB’s bodywork was crafted just a short distance away from Ferrari, at Scaglietti’s facilities in Modena, the bodywork for the GTS was designed and constructed by Pininfarina, at their facilities in Turin, and the car’s overall design was one of sporting elegance. Its smooth and more understated lines are handsome and display an air of sophistication, discreetly hiding the race-derived V-12 that sits under the hood. The interior displayed the same personality, yet it was perhaps more luxurious than earlier Ferraris, but it still retained both a Nardi wood-trimmed steering wheel and gated shifter, traits that would link it with its more performance-oriented siblings.
Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina 1966

One notable difference between the Coupe and Spider, other than the bodywork, is the GTS’s less heavily bolstered, albeit very comfortable, seats, which were trimmed in the traditional Connolly leather.
Even though the 275 GTB was perceived by many to be the more aggressive of the two, as it was better suited to high-performance driving thanks to its fixed roof, the 275 GTS was certainly no slouch. Its top speed was in excess of 140 mph, and with a curb weight of 2,960 pounds, the 275 GTS was capable of accelerating from 0 to 60 in 7.2 seconds. Road & Track raved about the 275 GTS in their road test, which was included in the September 1966 issue, commenting that “with the top down, all the extraneous noises disappear and one simply exults in the purr from those beautiful tailpipes. Sheer ecstasy.”
Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina 1966

All told, only 200 examples were produced, which was equal to less than half the 275 GTBs produced. As expected, most of the examples produced found their way to the warmer climates of America’s west or east coasts.

TWO OWNERS FROM NEW

Chassis 07805 was delivered new to the United States through Chinetti Motors, of Greenwich, Connecticut, in January 1966 and was then shipped to Loeber Motors, the Ferrari dealer in Chicago, Illinois. On April 15, 1967, it was sold for $12,400 to its original owner, prominent Windy City funeral director M.J. Suerth.
Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina 1966

Mr. Suerth would escape Chicago’s infamous winters to a home in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and that is where the new 275 GTS was directly shipped. For the next 10 years, it spent the winter being enthusiastically driven by its owner, with its cool “Floribbean” colors of Bianco (18934 M) over Bleu (3015 VM) fitting right in with the sunny climate.
In April 1977, the Suerth 275 GTS was advertised by its original owner in the Ferrari Club of America Newsletter, which stated that it had 17,785 recorded miles on its Borrani wire wheels. The current owner, a long-time Ferrari enthusiast, saw the advertisement, contacted Suerth, and purchased the car that same month for $18,000. When he picked up the car, he found that it was outfitted with some unusual accessories. There was a small cocktail bar set up over the passenger seat and gold MJS monograms, an anniversary gift from Mrs. Suerth, on the doors. Most surprisingly of all, the car had been outfitted with a trailer hitch. Mr. Suerth had used his 275 GTS primarily to tow a dinghy to and from his larger yacht.
Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina 1966

In a letter to the buyer, Mr. Suerth wrote, “I hope you will enjoy driving the little speed demon as much as I did. It has always been a dependable car.” Dependable, indeed! The current owner has lovingly driven, shown, and enjoyed the car frequently during his 37 years of ownership, running it to concours and club events all over northeastern United States, including at the Ferrari Club of America’s annual meet at Watkins Glen in 1990 and at the Meadow Brook Hall Concours d’Elegance in 1997. He has taken the time to preserve the Ferrari’s incredible original condition, with the only modification being to remove the gold MJS monograms and trailer hitch, which were returned to Mr. Suerth at his request. The current owner kept this car, among others, in a converted 19th century barn. During its stay, this 275 GTS has sat witness to many cars come and go from the shared wooden space. From Gullwing Mercedes to Iso Grifos to Maseratis, but the 275 GTS remained. It is a truly exceptional example, and its condition and road manners reflect its extraordinary custodianship. It is sure to please drivers and onlookers for decades to come.

marți, 28 octombrie 2014

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1961 - World Of Classic Cars -

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1961

To many, the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL is an automobile that needs no introduction. American Mercedes-Benz importer Max Hoffman was convinced that a road-legal version of the successful W194 racer would be profitable in the United States. He knew that his clients would love the performance and styling of such a vehicle, so he lobbied the top brass at Mercedes-Benz to develop the car. Luckily for him, and us, Hoffman’s wish was granted.
The automobile that followed was nothing short of extraordinary. The 300 SL, sporting a chassis directly developed from lessons learned in campaigning the W194, was the first production automobile that used fuel injection as opposed to carburation, which was a technological advancement that allowed it to become the fastest street-legal car of its day. When it premiered at the 1954 New York Auto Show, the public fell in love with the car not only for its performance but also for its breathtaking good looks and proportions. The design of the 300 SL would even catch the eye of Andy Warhol in 1986, when it was featured in a painting entitled Cars, which was commissioned by German art dealer Hans Meyer.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1961

Max Hoffman wanted an open version from the very beginning, and after the success of the coupe, a convertible version of the 300 SL was released, going on to attract even more buyers towards Mercedes-Benz’s most innovative sports car. Since the 300 SL would lose its top, engineers reinforced and modified the space-frame chassis to fit conventionally hinged doors, which simultaneously allowed for greater ease of entry by lowering the height of the chassis on the door line, albeit a small forfeiture of the original model’s character. Designers used this opportunity to make several slight changes to the 300 SL’s body, and many installed new headlights and a smaller grille opening and fitted dual chrome strips on the side sills, to give the car a more streamlined and glamorous look. The roadster was introduced in 1957, and it offered the performance and style that the coupe was known for but with a dash of practicality and the thrill of open-air driving, making for a motoring experience that was second to none.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1961

In order to keep performance on par with the coupe, all roadsters were offered with the more sporting NSL engine of the coupe as standard configuration. This made the roadster capable of top speeds that ranged from 133 to 155 mph, depending on the final drive ratio specified. Production on the roadster and the iconic W198 platform stopped in early 1963, with 1,858 examples being produced, making it even more popular than its gullwinged predecessor.
Also like the coupe, the roadster was certainly the item to have for the jet-set in the late ’50s and early ’60s. The 300 SL Roadsters were favored by celebrities for its style and racing drivers for its performance and brilliant engineering, and they often found homes with just about anyone who appreciated fine machinery and those who had the bank account to acquire it. With a list price of $11,000 when new, the style and performance it provided certainly came at a price. As with all great and historically important automobiles, it has retained that same persona to this day, and it remains amongst the world’s most desired cars.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1961

The 300 SL Roadster offered here was formerly part of the well-known Fred Kemp Collection of Mercedes-Benzes, which was displayed at the Kemp Automobile Museum in Missouri. After Mr. Kemp’s ownership, it was acquired by another enthusiast, who commissioned a no-expense-spared restoration of the matching-numbers car at the hands of Mercedes-Benz specialist Walter Quitte, of Costa Mesa, California.
The body was removed from the frame, and all of the panels were stripped to bare metal before being refinished. The engine, transmission, and rear end were all rebuilt. Mechanical work was performed by noted father-son team Walter and Dirk Quitt. The final gear ratio was also changed to 3.25:1, to provide for high speeds at lower rpms, which is ideal for touring. The brakes were found to be of the sought-after large-version drum brakes that were developed from racing experience, which were disassembled and then rebuilt.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1961

This Roadster, finished in Mercedes-Benz Black (DB 40) over tan leather (DB 1060) and correct leather-edged boucle-style carpet, is fitted with the desirable European-style headlamps, Rudge-style knock-off wheels, and modern radial tires, as well as both a soft-top and the factory removable hardtop.
A 300 SL Roadster is perhaps the most iconic model of Mercedes-Benz’s illustrious history. They are beautifully engineered and designed, and they are incredible automobiles to drive, as they exhibit both timeless styling and more than respectable performance by today’s standards.

Ferrari 333 SP 1998 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 333 SP 1998

“As the 1998 Daytona 24 Hours began, Ferrari’s record still stood at only one victory, in 1967, with Chris Amon and the late Lorenzo Bandini. After that 24 hours (and 31 years) a Ferrari had at last won again in the twice-around-the-clock Florida event, the first 24-hour win by any Ferrari since that 1967 victory.” – Marc Sonnery, Cavallino 111

FERRARI’S TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO SPORTS CAR RACING

The unveiling of the 333 SP heralded Ferrari’s return to sports car racing upon its introduction in 1994. The company had built much of its storied reputation on its sports racing cars, and this would be Ferrari’s first car of its type since the legendary 312 P. As history quickly proved, the 333 SP was a worthy heir to Ferrari’s prototype racing heritage.
Ferrari 333 SP 1998

Upon Ferrari’s departure from sports car racing, the company had shifted its focus to Formula One and focused solely on putting its drivers and cars on the top of the podium at the world’s grand prix circuits. During this nearly 20-year period, Ferrari remained noticeably absent from endurance racing, leaving former competitors to take Ferrari’s place at the front of the grid. As the story goes, Giampiero Moretti, the founder of the Momo automotive accessory empire and an amateur racing driver, walked into Piero Ferrari’s office in the early 1990s with a grand idea. Moretti wished to finish his racing career in a sports car race but only at the wheel of a Ferrari. With the support of Ferrari North America’s chief, Gian Luigi Butioni, the 333 SP was born.
Ferrari 333 SP 1998

This project was massively appealing to the higher-ups in Maranello, as Ferrari’s sports car racing effort was aimed at the key North American market; the United States did not host any Formula One races at that time. Instead, there was the IMSA World Series Sports Car Championship, which was in the midst of a rule change ahead of the 1994 season. This business case made perfect sense to Ferrari’s CEO, Luca di Montezemolo, who readily approved the plan to market the 333 SP to its privateers.
Of course, Ferrari didn’t turn its back completely on its Formula One team. It based the 333 SP’s carbon fiber composite chassis on its F92 structure, although the prototype racer was widened to comply with IMSA’s two-seat requirement. The car also had to be easily serviceable by private mechanics and pit crews; as a result, Ferrari modified its F50’s 4.7-liter, five-valve-per-cylinder V-12 to displace the IMSA-required 4.0 liters and increased the redline to nearly 12,000 rpm. The soundtrack was simply unforgettable.

CHASSIS 019: THE WINNINGEST OF ALL 333 SPs


Just before Christmas 1997, the Momo 333 SP was delivered to Doran-Moretti Racing to be prepared for the upcoming season, in which the first race would be the 24 Hours of Daytona on January 31st. In a feature article for issue 111 of Cavallino, driver Didier Theys describes how chassis 019 was tuned slightly by the team to perform better over 24 hours. Testing began during the first week of January, to prepare both the car and its team for one of the most challenging races on American soil. Of course, as the car was campaigned by a team headed by Giampiero Moretti, it was only right that Moretti would also find himself behind the wheel to finish out his career, just as he had described to Piero Ferrari a year earlier.
Ferrari 333 SP 1998

The two competitive outings for chassis 019 would be at a pair of the world’s most storied and competitive endurance races: the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 12 Hours of Sebring. After less than a month of preparation, the Doran-Moretti team arrived at Daytona with their 333 SP festooned in eye-catching red and yellow Momo livery, keen to make an impression. With Mauro Baldi, Arie Luyendyk, Didier Theys and Moretti himself as drivers, the car qualified second, an accomplishment that anyone would have been proud of—but one that would pale in comparison to their overall finish. Following a close battle with the Scandia Engineering 333 SP (and a minor off with Moretti behind the wheel), chassis 019 emerged at the front of the pack after 24 hours, and both drivers and crew where thrilled to take the checkered flag. This was a monumental moment for not only the team but for Ferrari themselves, as the marque had not been atop the podium at that event since 1967.
Ferrari 333 SP 1998

Moretti, Theys, and Baldi would return behind the wheel of chassis 019 at the 12 Hours of Sebring just a few weeks later. Qualifying slightly further back on the grid didn’t hinder the team in the slightest, and the car eventually found its way to the front of the pack, where it would stay and once again cross the finish line in first place overall. Coming out of March 1998 with two overall wins at two of the most arduous events on the calendar was nothing short of spectacular and caused quite a stir in the motorsports community.
The next event for the Doran-Moretti team would be the 1,000 km of Monza, and sadly the result would not be as impressive as its first two races, since the 333 SP failed to finish due to a battery issue. However, chassis 019 would prove competitive once again in its next event, the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Finishing 3rd in its class, this would be the final professional event for chassis 019, closing the book on a short but highly successful racing career, which cemented the 333 SP’s reputation within the storied history of sport-prototypes to wear the Cavallino Rampante.
Ferrari 333 SP 1998

Following its retirement from professional racing after its appearance at Le Mans, the car was flown back to the United States, where, as can be expected from a car that just finished three major endurance races, it was totally rebuilt, including its five-speed gearbox, to prepare it for a second life as a vintage racer. Within a month of arriving stateside, it was sold to Charles Arnott of Easton, Maryland, who entrusted the car to Cavallino magazine, where it would be featured in issue 111 in an article written by Marc Sonnery. Despite its retirement, chassis 019’s fame would never fade, and it was featured frequently in motorsports publications, including once more in Cavallino, reviewing its stint at Le Mans, as well as in Forza.
Ferrari 333 SP 1998

There is no question that chassis 019 is the most successful and iconic 333 SP. With overall wins at both Daytona and Sebring, not to mention a third-in-class finish at Le Mans, it boasts spectacular racing pedigree that puts it in an elite group.