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luni, 1 septembrie 2014

Ferrari 599XX 2010 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 599XX 2010

No manufacturer of premium sports cars has a more direct relationship to its racing programs and successes than Ferrari. Although factory-based F1 and sports car competition have always been at the core of this relationship, Ferrari has also consistently engaged customers over the years in various ways, whether as team owners or racing privateers. Racing customers have always provided a good sounding board for development of the company’s numerous production-based competition cars, including some of the most legendary vintage sports racers, barchettas, berlinettas, and spiders.
Ferrari 599XX 2010

Even within the realm of Ferrari supercars, few claim such a unique design brief as the 599XX. The 599XX was introduced in 2009 and was based on Ferrari’s stellar 599 GTB Fiorano. Its purpose was to push the envelope of road and racing technology to keep Ferrari atop the sports car world in terms of performance. Thus, whilst it bears the silhouette of the standard 599, the 599XX is a much more savage beast.
So extreme was the engineering of airflow and downforce on the 599XX that two fans were installed in the boot to draw air from the undertray and funnel it through the former tail lamp valances.
Ferrari 599XX 2010

Functional vents and scoops decorate almost every panel of the car, instantly clarifying the degree of wind tunnel development that went into the model. Its suspension engineering was particularly astonishing, as it had state-of-the-art SCM Magnetoreological damping that contributed to traction control, which was adjustable via a dash-mounted “manetinno” that offered nine different graduated settings.
The engine was powered by a highly modified version of the 599 GTB’s six-litre V-12, and it generated 730 horsepower and 506 foot-pounds of torque, which was enough to catapult the car from 0–60 mph in just 2.9 seconds. In addition to upgrades like mechanical tappets and graphite-coated pistons, Ferrari implemented a particularly unusual addition for a race-prepared motor. The company guaranteed the engine for at least 5,000 kilometres, almost daring customers to try to blow them out during track events.
Ferrari 599XX 2010

From within, there is no doubt that this is a competition-oriented vehicle, as it has been outfitted with a roll cage and a single carbon-fibre dash panel, which dominates the spartan cockpit. Whilst nearly all other amenities are stripped away, the 599XX is outfitted with air conditioning, serving as a reminder that this car is meant to be enjoyed by customers just as much as it is to be strenuously raced; this is a concept that was also reinforced by the model’s somewhat unusual production mandate.
Referring to the 599XX, Ferrari test driver Raffaele De Simone said, “We were pleased that this car turned out to be far more drivable than the Enzo FXX”. Indeed, the 599 derivative matched the Enzo FXX’s lap times at the Fiorano test track. Ferrari even sent an example to the Nürburgring, where, on 21 April 2010, Raffaele de Simone achieved an astonishing lap time of 6:58:16, breaking the lap record and proving to be even faster than the Enzo (7:25:7). This time is comparable to the lap time realised by Niki Lauda in the 312 Formula One car, when he gained the pole during the qualification race at the German Grand Prix on 2 August 1975. Rarely has a production-based track car been built that so comprehensively utilises every available technology for optimal performance.
Ferrari 599XX 2010

The 599XX was manufactured in a sparing quantity of just 29 examples, and it was intended to be driven at track events under Ferrari’s Corse Clienti program, a specialised program of non-competitive events held around the world. Alongside Ferrari’s FXX, the 599XX was intended to help Ferrari conduct research and make developments based on the “owner-test drivers” results at specially sanctioned events that were organised by the Scuderia at race tracks around the world. Ferrari will provide owners with all the support required in maintaining such a car, and they will also provide owners with feedback on their driving technique and data that has been collected from the car. Whilst Corse Clienti events take place on three continents, 599XX owners can opt to leave their cars in Ferrari’s custody in Maranello, where Ferrari will service and maintain the car to race-ready condition and prepare it for delivery to each event by Ferrari’s own transportation. Owners can also drive their cars in private sessions on various tracks.
Ferrari 599XX 2010

Wearing number 17, this sensational 599XX has accumulated just 600 kilometres on its odometer, from factory testing and one outing at the Circuit Paul Ricard. All factory spares delivered with the car are present, and it remains ready for more track use.
Chassis 170354 also remains eligible for the optional Evoluzione upgrade from the factory. The Evoluzione package was introduced in December 2011, for the 2012–2013 racing seasons, and it offered a plethora of performance upgrades, which were the result of feedback from the first generation of 599XX owners and experiences within Formula One. The biggest changes to the 599XX dealt with the car’s aerodynamics. The Evoluzione package includes an electronically adjustable rear wing, a modified front splitter, a new rear diffuser, and recalibrated electronic controls; these all function in an effort to help the car perform better through corners. Overall horsepower and torque would be increased to 750 and 516 foot-pounds with the addition of side exhausts. Coupled with the added power and a shorter final gear ratio, the 599XX EVO can lap Fiorano in 1:15.

duminică, 31 august 2014

Ferrari F40 1990 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari F40 1990

The year 1987 was a landmark one for Ferrari. Not only was “Il Commendatore” celebrating his 90th birthday, but his company was also celebrating its 40th anniversary. It is reported that he decided to build something special: an all-out, traditional sports car that would succeed the 288 GTO as the ultimate Ferrari.
Mechanically, the F40 bore much in common with the 288 GTO, and it was, in fact, closely based on the 288 GTO Evoluzione, a race version of the GTO that never saw competition due to a change in regulations. The F40’s type F120 AB chassis shared the wheelbase dimensions of its predecessor, but it featured a wider track and the extensive use of carbon fibre and Kevlar; the lightweight body also featured NACA ducts that contributed to cabin and brake cooling, whilst the engine was displayed under a louvered Plexiglas engine cover.
Ferrari F40 1990

The F40’s engine is based on the 288 GTO’s twin-turbocharged V-8 and was bored to displace almost three litres, which, in combination with additional tuning, contributed to an output of 478 brake horsepower, making the F40 Ferrari’s most powerful road car to date. The powerful engine and lightweight construction helped the F40 deliver breath-taking performance, hitting 60 mph from a standstill in 3.8 seconds, with a top speed of 201 mph, making it the fastest car in the world when it was launched.
With the special distinction as the last Maranello road car to be engineered under Enzo Ferrari’s direct leadership, the F40 remains one of the most celebrated high-performance supercars ever built.
Ferrari F40 1990

The F40 presented here was delivered new to celebrated Dutch Ferrari distributor Kroymans in 1990, and it passed through just two owners’ hands before being acquired by the current owner in 2005. Chassis number 82727 was delivered in the now coveted “non-cat, non-adjustable” configuration, meaning that it is without a catalytic converter or adjustable suspension. It was finished in the traditional Rosso Corsa and is equipped with a Fuchs titanium exhaust system and rare leather sports seats, with the latter adding a touch of class to the race-inspired interior.
The F40 was the ultimate, and final, Ferrari supercar designed and built under the stewardship of Enzo Ferrari himself. Chassis number 82727 is a fantastic example of an uncompromising and incredibly exciting car that is renowned amongst Ferrari experts for delivering outrageous performance and impeccable style.

joi, 28 august 2014

Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione 'Verde York' 1992 - World Of Classic Cars -

Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione 'Verde York' 1992

The Lancia Delta, which was originally developed as an ordinary family car, was turned upside-down in 1985 with the introduction of the S4 for Group B rallying. This was short-lived, as the S4 was withdrawn from racing with the cancelation of the unlimited class in 1986. For the 1987 season, Lancia introduced the Abarth-prepared Delta HF 4WD.
As the HF had four-wheel drive and was powered by a turbocharged 2.0-litre inline four, it dominated the World Rally Championship with 46 WRC victories, and it won the Constructors’ Championship a record six times in a row, from 1987 to 1992. This included championship titles for Juha Kankkunen in 1987 and 1991 and Miki Biasion in 1988 and 1989. At the time, the Lancia Delta Group A had no equal.
Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione 'Verde York' 1992

By 1989, the production version of the Delta was tied hand in glove with the development of Lancia’s competition cars. The new Delta HF Integrale engine, upgraded from eight valves, was powered by a 16-valve 200 horsepower variant. With continuous development, Lancia introduced what is now referred to as the Evoluzione, or “Evo”, in 1991. The Evo was built as the final homologation version for the Lancia Rally Team, and it was the ultimate expression of technological innovation.
The first Evoluzione was a far cry from the small family car that it was derived from, as it boasted 210 horsepower and numerous visual cues that hinted at its tarmac-tearing performance. With a pronounced bonnet, numerous air vents, and even further flared wings, there was no denying that the Lancia Delta of 1980 was all grown up.
Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione 'Verde York' 1992

Presented here is a limited edition Verde York Lancia Delta HF Intergrale Evoluzione. It was released in the summer of 1992 and was designed to “put special emphasis on the values of performance and technical sophistication” for Lancia’s more discerning customers. This special edition example was finished in York Green 344 and has perforated Champagne leather with green stitching. It also features Solextra tinted windows and Recaro seats. As noted, it is the 23rd of a limited run of 200 examples.
In 2011, a former owner commissioned a complete restoration of this rare Verde York edition by a renowned Lancia expert. With the goal of returning the car to as it was when it left the factory, every single component was dismantled, reconditioned or replaced, and then reassembled.
Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione 'Verde York' 1992

The Delta came from humble beginnings as a utilitarian car for the masses, but its subsequent rally heritage and technological evolution has turned this everyday car into one of the most brutal machines on both gravel and tarmac.

luni, 25 august 2014

SS 100 Jaguar 2½-Litre Roadster 1937 - World Of Classic Cars -

SS 100 Jaguar 2½-Litre Roadster 1937

The SS Jaguar 100 was the first true performance car from SS, and it breathed new life into the gorgeous design of its predecessor, the SS 90, with a revised radiator, new headlamps, and sporty Le Mans-type fuel tank. Under the bonnet was markedly improved performance, with a new 102-horsepower, overhead-valve six-cylinder engine with a new cylinder head and dual SU carburettors. The model was named for the top speed that it could reach, 100 mph, and it quickly became popular with enthusiasts. That enthusiasm has never waned.
SS 100 marketing literature described it as having been “designed primarily for competition work…[but] equally suitable for ordinary road use, for despite the virility of its performance, it is sufficiently tractable for use as a fast touring car without modification”. Many owners took this to heart and used their cars both as primary transportation and in many forms of motorsport, including hill climbs, rallies, and road races. As a result, an SS 100 was a common sight at such circuits as Donington Park and RAC rallies.
SS 100 Jaguar 2½-Litre Roadster 1937

The 2½-Litre Roadster shown here is recorded in The Forerunners of Jaguar, by Terry McGrawth, as having been delivered from the factory 23 July 1937, and then it was sold to L. Freeman. It is one of few survivors with period competition history, which includes such finishes as 3rd in the 25-mile Strathpine race at Brisbane in August 1946 and a 1st place finish in the same race in September 1947, driven by then-owner Walter Mathison. Continuing the car’s competition heritage, it was later owned by the late renowned builder and driver of racing Jaguars, Tom Walkinshaw, as part of his personal collection. It is important to note that the car’s rallying participation has been continued in recent decades, including participation in the 1988 Coppa D’Italia and more recently in the Mille Miglia.
SS 100 Jaguar 2½-Litre Roadster 1937

A total restoration was undertaken in the late 1990s, returning the car to period-correct specification. This SS 100 retains its original matching-numbers engine and drivetrain, and it has more recently been refinished in its original, extremely attractive factory colour of Suede Green, with dark green hides, green carpets, and a fawn bonnet. It runs on body-colour-coded wire wheels that are shod in Dunlop tyres.

duminică, 24 august 2014

joi, 21 august 2014

Lancia 037 Group B 1983 - World Of Classic Cars -

Lancia 037 Group B 1983

Changes to the FIA Group B regulations at the dawn of the 1980s prompted rally competitors to design purpose-built cars that required a small number, just 200 examples, of homologated road going models to be sold to the public.
Working with Abarth, which was now part of the Lancia-Fiat group, engineers created project number 037 as a replacement for the vaunted Lancia Stratos HF. Despite its less-than-auspicious name, 037 was conceived with input from some of Italy’s best: Abarth, Pininfarina, and Dallara.
Lancia 037 Group B 1983

This was a racer that was designed to recall the Lancia Beta-based Montecarlo/Scorpion, and it was bodied from Kevlar that was reinforced with fibreglass panels. It also featured a steel sub-frame that was visible when its massive bonnet and boot access panels were opened. Although it didn’t really look much like the Montecarlo/Scorpion, the Pininfarina-penned 037 featured a handful of design cues that served as a visual nod to Lancia’s past, including a unique “double bubble” roofline.
Lancia 037 Group B 1983

A 2.0-litre, supercharged four-cylinder engine powered the first 037s, and an enlarged 2.1-litre one eventually followed. The engine was supercharged instead of turbocharged in an effort to improve throttle response and to quell turbo lag, and it was initially rated at 255 horsepower. The introduction of water injection helped boost that figure to 300 horsepower, whilst the 2.1-litre variant raised that number to 325 horsepower.
The mid-mounted engine sent power to the rear wheels via a five-speed manual gearbox, making the 037 the last of its kind before all-wheel drive became commonplace in the WRC. German firm ZF supplied the 037’s robust rear end. A total of 28 examples of the Evolution 1 037 were assembled, and about 207 Stradale versions were eventually assembled to comply with FIA regulations.
Lancia 037 Group B 1983

The 037 made its racing debut at the 1982 Rally Costa Smeralda in Italy, but it wasn’t until 1983 that Lancia experienced real success with the car. Despite competition from the AWD Audi Quattro, the 037 prevailed, with Walter Röhrl and Markku Alen behind the wheel.
Chassis 210, registered as TO Y88743, was campaigned during the 1983 World Rally Championship season, and it helped the automaker capture the manufacturer’s title over Audi. The Martini Racing team used it for several races during the season. At the Tour de Corse, taking place from 5–7 May, it was driven by Jean-Claude Andruet, but it failed to finish. Later that month, at the Acropolis Rally, this car finished 5th overall, at the hands of Bettega and Perissinot. Following its impressive result in Greece, Pentti Airikkala and Juha Piironen would finish in 5th place once more at the 1,000 Lakes Rally. Finally, in early October, chassis 210 was used as a test car at the Rallye Sanremo for the Bettega/Perissinot duo.
Lancia 037 Group B 1983

After its racing career, Fiat sold chassis 210 to a noted French collector. After being driven in several editions of the Tour Auto in the late 1990s and early 2000s, it found its way to the current owner in Italy.
This 037 represents a unique glimpse into an iconic era of Italian rally history, in particular the short-lived but revered Group B rally cars.

marți, 19 august 2014

Ford Mustang 289 Racing Car 1965 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ford Mustang 289 Racing Car 1965

This notchback Mustang has had vast expense lavished on it in order to build it into an ideal historic race/rally competitor. The shell was sent to highly regarded preparer Rae Davis Racing, and main assembly and preparation was carried out by the talented men at CCK Historics of Kent, with an array of invoices for their work and the parts purchased on file.
The car has been fitted with a six-point roll cage by Caged Manufacturing Ltd., and it has a Cobra Evolution pro seat with TRS race belts, a Lifeline plumbed fire extinguisher system and ignition cut-off, and a caged cockpit-mounted Varley Red Top dry cell battery. The shifter has a Momo knob, and the period-style deep-dish racing wheel is adorned with a Stack racing rev counter, with a shift light on the dash top. The dashboard centre boasts Racetech water temperature and OIL pressure gauges, which are neatly mounted, and an ATL 120-litre boxed bag-style fuel tank is in the rear. Twin Facet pumps and fuel and brake lines have also been installed inside the car.
Ford Mustang 289 Racing Car 1965

The engine bay is extremely well-presented, and it is littered with even more goodies, including a new Holley carburettor with an Edelbrock air filter, a remote OIL cooler, a Mallory distributor, and a Rainbow electric cooling fan. Lightweight Perspex side and rear windows have been fitted, along with TRS tow straps. The car rides on Koni shock absorbers and new five-spoke alloy wheels that have been shod in Dunlop Racing M-section tyres.
This car is attractively finished in period-style Ford France colours, and it is in excellent condition, having accumulated only shakedown and rolling road mileage since build completion. Interestingly, it had its first test outing at Goodwood, with former Formula One driver Rupert Keegan at the helm, and aside from a few small items, which have been tended to, it performed well and received a clean bill of health.