Invest In Fun

Invest In Fun

duminică, 14 septembrie 2014

Porsche 904 - World Of Classic Cars - Rank 175

Porsche 904 Carrera GTS 1964

The Porsche 904 is an automobile which was produced by Porsche in Germany in 1964 and 1965. It was officially called Porsche Carrera GTS due to the same naming rights problem that required renaming the Porsche 901 to Porsche 911.

History

After having withdrawn from Formula One at the end of the 1962 season, Porsche focused again on sportscar racing. The 904 debuted late in 1963, for the 1964 racing season, as a successor to the 718, which had been introduced in 1957. Porsche designed the GTS variant to compete in the FIA-GT class at various international racing events. The street-legal version debuted in 1964 in order to comply with Group 3 Appendix J homologation regulations requiring a certain number of road-going variants be sold by the factory. Porsche produced 106 904s at four or five a day with a list price of US$7245 (FOB Stuttgart). Orders far exceeded the one hundred car requirement to satisfy homologation rules and more cars could readily have been sold. The 904 marked the beginning of a series of sportscars that culminated in the mighty 917.

Engine
Porsche 904/6 Carrera GTS 1965

The 904's mid-engine layout was inherited from the 718, also known as the RSK (Rennsport = racing, kurz = short), the factory's leading race car. It was powered by the 1,966 cc (120 cu in) Type 587/3,[4] four-cam flat four-cylinder engine producing 198 hp (148 kW), "probably the most complex four-cylinder" ever. It drove a five-speed transmission with a standard 4.428:1 final drive, with available 4.605, 4.260, 3.636, and 3.362 ratios.

Begun as the Type 547, its development began in 1953, when the previous VW-based 1,100 cc (67 cu in) flat-four, used in the contemporary 356 and rated at 38 hp (28 kW), hit the limit of its potential. Porsche realized it needed something all-new. The brainchild of Dr. Ernst Fuhrmann, later Technical Director, it was hoped to achieve an "unheard of" 70 hp (52 kW) per 1 l (61 cu in), relying on hemispherical combustion chambers (what would be called hemi in the U.S.) and 46 mm (1.8 in)-throat 46IDA3 three-choke Weber carburetors to generate 112 hp (84 kW) from the 1,500 cc (92 cu in) four-cam engine. The 1.5 liter weighed 310 lb (140 kg) dry, eventually producing 180 hp (134 kW). A complex design that proved "very taxing" to build and assemble, but very durable, it was used in 34 different models, including 550 Spyders, 356 Carreras, and F2/1s.

Chassis
Porsche 904/6 Carrera GTS Factory Works Protoype 1963

The 904 was the first Porsche to use a ladder chassis and fibreglass body, appearing more like specialist racing cars than the modified sports cars typical at the time, and was painted white. The fibreglass body was bonded to its steel chassis for extra rigidity, and achieved a drag coefficient of 0.34. While many German race cars had used unpainted aluminium bodies since the famous 1934 Silver Arrows, most 904s were painted silver, the modern German national racing color. Unusually for Porsche, the two-seater bodies were provided by contractors, which would later become standard practice among race car builders. The 904's fibreglass body was made by spraying chopped fibreglass into a mold, the amount sprayed often varied in thickness over the shape of the car and as a result the weight of the various cars was somewhat inconsistent; some were heavier than others. Race-prepared four-cylinder 904s weighed in at approximately 1,443 pounds (655 kg) and the low weight gave the 904 the ability to accelerate to 60 mph (97 km/h) from a standstill in less than six seconds (using the standard rear gear, which would be typical at Sebring) and to reach a top speed of 160 mph (260 km/h) (with the 3.362 ratio). Frontal area was only 14 sq ft (1.3 m2).

Suspension
Porsche 904 Carrera GTS 1964

The Porsche 904 rode on coil springs (the first Porsche not to use trailing arm front and swingaxle rear suspension), with unequal-length A-arms in front. The wheelbase was 90.5 in (2,300 mm) (by contrast, the Corvair's was 108 in (2,700 mm)), track front and rear 51.7 in (1,310 mm), height 42 in (1,100 mm), and ground clearance of 4.7 in (120 mm) on 15 in (380 mm) wheels. Brakes were 275 mm (10.8 in) discs at front and 285 mm (11.2 in) at rear.

904/6

To satisfy demand, twenty 1965 models were produced, some featuring a variant of the 911's flat six. Due to the less weight issues of the first generation plastic body, the 904's successor, the 1966 906 or "Carrera 6", was developed with a tubular space frame covered with an unstressed, lighter fiberglass body.

904/8
Porsche 904/6 Carrera GTS 1965

A few factory race cars were fitted with a flat eight-cylinder power plant derived from the 1962 804 F1 car, the 225 hp (168 kW) 1,962 cc (119.7 cu in) Type 771, which used 42 mm (1.7 in)-throat downdraft Webers. The Type 771s, however, suffered a "disturbing habit" of making their flywheels explode.

Racing

Making an inauspicious debut at Sebring in 1964, where it suffered clutch trouble, "a four-cylinder 904 took an astounding first overall" at the Targa Florio. It went on to a third at the Nürburgring and a perfect finish at LeMans. Both times, all five starters finished, placed in the top twelve overall, among many much more powerful cars. 904s showed remarkable durability; they "almost always" finished, and at Reims in 1964, a customer car fresh from Stuttgart, driven to the track, went on to win without the need for any spares at all. For 1964, 904s racked up a 1-2 at the Targa Florio and class wins at Spa, Sebring (co-driven by Briggs Cunningham and Lake Underwood), the Nürburgring, Le Mans, Watkins Glen, Zandvoort, Canada, and the Paris 1000 Kilometer, in the process taking SCCA's C-Production and E-Sports Racing titles. In addition, it won rally events including the Tulip, Munich-Vienna-Budapest, Geneva, and "highly acclaimed" Alpine Rally. For 1965, results were "equally impressive", seeing wins at the Spanish, Rossfeld, Hellbronner, and Gaisburg rallys, as well as a class win in a gruelling Monte Carlo Rally which saw just 22 finishers in the points, out of 237 starters. In addition, 904s won their class at the Monza 1000 Kilometer, Targa, Spa, Daytona Continental, Le Mans, and Zandvoort, among others, repeating their E-Sports title win and adding an SCCA E-Production championship.


sâmbătă, 13 septembrie 2014

Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype Photos - World Of Classic Cars -

Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype

Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype 1982 - World Of Classic Cars -

Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype 1982

Few race cars of the Porsche pantheon are as universally acclaimed as the 956. The car is a brilliantly engineered aesthetic wonder. It was born of another round of FISA rule changes that ultimately resulted in the emergence of several marque innovations. The 956 was the first Porsche race car to feature monocoque construction, with even the engine serving as a load-bearing component. The 956 was also the first such car to feature so-called ground effects, which are the aerodynamic channelling body features that maximise cornering force. The 935/76 flat-six turbocharged engine, which was a development of the company’s foray into Indy racing, was tuned to meet the new Group C regulations, which limited fuel use during races.
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype 1982

The 956 was a winner from the start, as it took a 1-2-3 finish at the 1982 24 Hours of Le Mans in just its second race. The model then dominated the next few seasons, with the Rothmans-sponsored Porsche factory team winning Le Mans again in 1983 and privateering 956s taking the honour in 1984 and 1985. After four straight wins by the 956 at Sarthe, FISA changed Group C rules again, in an apparent attempt to do away with the unbeatable car. Despite these measures, the modified development of the 956 that emerged, the 962, posted an equally impressive run in Group C and the IMSA-GT series in the United States. In total, the 956 and its derivative dominated prototype racing for over 10 years, undergoing remarkably little modification during that time, which is a true testament to the success of its design.
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype 1982

Chassis 956-004 is the fourth of just ten factory examples produced in the 956’s first year. The car was completed on 18 June 1982, and it set off for Le Mans the following morning. The car, running as #3, was fitted with a long-tail rear bonnet (for improved stability on the Mulsanne Straight) and was driven by Hurley Haywood and Al Holbert, with factory test driver (and current Porsche guru) Jürgen Barth taking over for Haywood after he became ill. At 4:00 a.m. on Sunday morning, the car was in 9th place, climbing to 4th within six hours. At just over 23 hours, 956-004 entered the top three, holding position through to the remainder of the race to finish 3rd in Porsche’s famous 1-2-3 sweep.
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype 1982

Following Le Mans, 956-004 was fitted with the shorter high-downforce rear bonnet, and it assumed the duties of car #2, but it was now piloted by the legendary Derek Bell and Australian driver Vern Schuppan. At the 1000 KM of Spa on 5 September 1982, the car finished 2nd, but a tyre failure at the Fuji 6 Hours on 3 October resulted in a DNF. The car returned to form at Kyalami on 6 November, taking 2nd place.
Entering the 1983 season, 956-004 faced somewhat of a disadvantage, as the new 1983 customer cars featured lighter chassis. As such, 004 was used as a reserve during Monza and Spa in the spring of 1983, and then it was ultimately withdrawn from Le Mans after being officially entered for Schuppan and Barth. Interestingly, the car was instead driven for qualifying by Bell, Barth, and Jacky Ickx, and they simultaneously used it as a camera car for a John Frankenheimer film that was never actually released.
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype 1982

Following accidents to two other factory cars, 956-004 was again pressed into duty at Spa on 4 September, where it was driven by Bell and Stefan Bellof to a 2nd place finish. The car took the quickest time in the first session of qualifying at Brands Hatch two weeks later, and it finished 3rd in the race on 18 September. Chassis 004 concluded the season at Fuji as a camera car, and it returned in 1984 in a subsidiary role, serving as a spare car at Monza on 23 April 1984. On May 13, at Silverstone, the car was again raced as a camera car, although now under the banner of GTi engineering, and it was driven by Richard Lloyd and Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason.
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype 1982

Entering the swansong of its competition life, 956-004 raced at the Spa 1000 KM on 2 September, taking 6th place as car #3 and being driven by Schuppan and John Watson. At Fuji, on 30 September, Lloyd again drove the 956 as a camera car, and on 2 December, the 956 concluded its competition career with an 8th place finish at Sandown Park in Australia, where it was piloted by Schuppan and 1980 F1 Champion Alan Jones. Although it was delivered to Monza in April 1985 for possible entry, and it was used for many practice laps by Jacky Ickx, 956-004 was ultimately relegated to spare-car status for the race, marking the finish of its well-documented racing pedigree.
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype 1982

After several major accidents in customer cars, and in an effort to improve safety, Porsche nominated chassis 004 and 010 as candidates for further safety testing. This car was then directly purchased from the factory on 14 August 1990, by Willi Kauhsen, a former privateer who raced Porsches during the late 1960s and early 1970s. This transaction was reportedly conducted directly between Mr Kauhsen and then-Porsche chief Dr Ulrich Bez (now the CEO of Aston Martin) at the behest of renowned Weissach engineer Helmut Flegl. Mr Kauhsen arranged for a factory-supervised rebuild as a component of his purchase, and the process was overseen at Weissach by mechanics Walter Marelja and Dieter Hecker, the original members of the 956 development team. Following completion of the restoration, the execution was assured by a careful inspection in July 1992 by Rolf Sprenger, Porsche’s onetime chief of maintenance and service.
Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype 1982

Chassis 956-004 has been rarely used or driven since restoration, and it has not experienced significant time apart from its appearance at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in 2012. This car, which was acquired by the consignor more recently, boasts associations with some of Porsche’s most important drivers, including Derek Bell and Jürgen Barth, and it has a bona fide competition record of great merit, including its memorable 3rd place finish at Le Mans in 1982.

vineri, 12 septembrie 2014

Jaguar D-Type 1955 - World Of Classic Cars -

Jaguar D-Type 1955

The mighty D-Type succeeded Jaguar’s C-Type with a smashing debut at the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans, where it roared to a 2nd overall finish. Although the model was powered by a further developed version of the C-Type’s long-running 3.4-litre XK competition engine, the D-Type varied from its predecessor with completely different construction, which featured two chassis sub-frames bolted to a monocoque. The coachwork was a beautiful study of aerodynamics that was penned by Malcolm Sayer, and it had the unmistakable suggestions of the forthcoming E-Type, including the introduction of the iconic oval-mouth grille.
Jaguar D-Type 1955

Just 54 customer cars and 6 factory team cars were built over a three-year period. On the endurance circuits of the period, few cars could match the D-Type, with multiple dominating performances at Nürburgring, Reims, Sebring, and, most importantly, three consecutive victories at Le Mans between 1955 and 1957. The D-Type is an aesthetic masterpiece that sealed Jaguar’s position in post-war racing lore, and it will forever be considered one of the era’s most important and beguiling sports cars.
Chassis number XKD 520 is the seventh customer D-Type built, and it was ordered new in June 1955, through Australian importer Jack Bryson, on behalf of its first owner, Bib Stillwell, a local sports car racer and future four-time consecutive winner of the open-wheel Australian Drivers’ Championship. After arriving in Melbourne in January 1956, this car was used extensively by Stillwell, setting numerous sports car records at local circuits, including the Bathurst 500 and the Rob Roy Hill Climb, and it took an outright victory at the South Australia Trophy in Port Wakefield. After briefly being prepared for a run at a landspeed record, XKD 520 returned to sports car class competition, winning the Bathurst Road Racing Championship in 1956.
Jaguar D-Type 1955

The slate of triumphs continued with the D-Type’s performance at the Moomba Tourist Trophy at Albert Park in Melbourne, where the car roared to a 2nd place finish in March 1956, as well as the Australian Tourist Trophy at the same location in November, where the car finished 5th. Mr Stillwell’s career in XKD 520 essentially concluded the following spring on 24 March 1957, when he took 3rd place at Albert Park.
A short time later, this beautiful D-Type was purchased by AMPOL (the Australian Motorists Petrol Company), on behalf of Jack Davey, who was a wartime radio personality of great regional renown. It was entrusted to Bill Murray, of Surfer’s Paradise, and was prepared for the AMPOL-sponsored speed trials, but unfortunately, an accident during transport prevented the car’s participation in the race. The D-Type was then sold to enthusiast Frank Gardner, who rebuilt the still-capable race car and undertook a competition campaign of his own, taking 2nd place at Bathurst in 1958, 1st place at the Mount Druitt Hill Climb, and 3rd place at both of the Orange Racing Car Scratch Races (where he notably only lost to grand prix cars).
Jaguar D-Type 1955

In November 1958, XKD 520 was sold to David Finch, who soon fitted the car with a factory-supplied 3.8-litre engine, which was a more powerful motor that was equipped on later D-Types and sometimes sold as a replacement engine. The new engine prolonged the car’s competitive ability, allowing it to gamely participate in the Longford event of 1960 and to take 1st overall at the Queensland Tourist Trophy of 1961. Around this time, a minor incident necessitated work to the front end, and Mr Finch took the opportunity to replace the nose with a long-nose bonnet crafted by Sydney body-man Ian Standfield, in the style of the Le Mans-winning long-nose D-Types.
Jaguar D-Type 1955

In May 1962, this outstanding Jaguar was purchased by Ash Marshall and treated to a thorough freshening, which included chroming multiple components. Over the next few years, the car passed through ownership by Peter Bradley and Richard Parkinson, before being acquired in 1967 by racing great Richard Attwood, the future Le Mans winner. Attwood would keep the car for some 10 years, before selling it to Sir Angus Spencer Nairn.
In 1977, Chris Keith-Lucas picked the car up from Mr Attwood’s residence on behalf of the new owner. In a letter, of which a copy is included on file, Keith-Lucas recalls the car fondly: “It was generally quite well-presented, but [it] needed a straight forward recomissioning before being sent to the new owner”.
Jaguar D-Type 1955

Few businesses could be better prepared to treat XKD 520 to a light freshening. Whilst under Lynx’s care, the car was tended by managing director Chris Keith-Lucas—a recognised marque expert who would later go on to found the well-known and highly regarded CKL Developments—commencing nearly 30 years of attention by Mr Keith-Lucas.
Angus used his D-Type lightly, taking part on several track days and competing in the Mille Miglia retrospective, although the car was never seriously raced during that time. In 2004, XKD 520 was acquired by Clive Jarman. It was sent back for maintenance work by Keith-Lucas, who, by this time, had founded his own company, CKL Developments. Jarman decided to correct one feature of XKD 520 that had remained unsatisfactory to him for many years. As mentioned, the original short-nose bonnet had been replaced in 1961 with a long-nose version. As it was not entirely correct, CKL managed to source an original short-nose bonnet that had been discarded decades ago during the restoration of an XKSS. It should be noted that the Australian crafted long-nose bonnet is supplied with the car, as it remains a part of its notable history. Now with a correct-type bonnet, Mr Keith-Lucas states: “In my opinion, [this] car remains one of the best production D-Types in existence today. To the very best of my knowledge, [it] has retained its principle components since the end of the 1950s. It is one of my favourite D-Types”.

joi, 11 septembrie 2014

Jaguar XK140 SE Fixed Head Coupé 1955 - World Of Classic Cars -

Jaguar XK140 SE Fixed Head Coupé 1955

The Jaguar XK120 created a sensation at the 1948 London Motor Show. It was low and lithe, with a curvaceous envelope body, and it had a newly designed dual overhead-cam six of 3,442 cubic centimetres. There was nothing else like it on the market, and in 1951, a handsome fixed head coupé was added to the line.
For 1955, the XK120 chassis was redesigned with larger torsion bars, better brakes, and rack-and-pinion steering. The engine was given higher-lift camshafts, which had the effect of raising horsepower to 190. There were also subtle appearance changes, such as the grille being given fewer bars that were more widely spaced and full-width bumpers being added.
Jaguar XK140 SE Fixed Head Coupé 1955

Moving the engine forward about three inches allowed for a roomier cockpit, but it required the relocation of the battery compartment into the front wing. The car was re-designated XK140, and two “Special Equipment” variants were added, the XK140 M, which included a crankshaft dampener, wire wheels, a dual exhaust, twin fog lamps, and windshield washers, and the XK140 SE (also known as the MC), which added the big-valve cylinder head from the C-Type, raising horsepower to 210.
This XK140 SE Fixed Head Coupé is an outstanding example of the highly desirable Special Equipment version that featured the C-Type cylinder head. It was ordered through A&M Kooheji, the Jaguar distributors in Bahrain, and it was delivered to James R. Heising, who registered it briefly in the UK before exporting it to Pasadena, California. Shortly thereafter, it was sold to another California owner, in whose family it remained for more than 40 years.
Jaguar XK140 SE Fixed Head Coupé 1955

In the 1990s, the car received a body-off restoration to the highest standards by renowned Jaguar specialist Mike Wilson in Visalia, California, and it was used only sparingly thereafter. The car has won numerous awards, including 2nd overall in the highly competitive Jaguar Club North America Championship.
The current owner acquired this XK140 in 1998. At the time, it was described as one of the best in the world. It has since been maintained to the highest standard, and it continues to justify its claim as one of the finest examples. It is totally authentic, with its original engine and tool roll, and it is finished in the original, as confirmed by its JDHT Certificate, and very desirable colour combination of Battleship Grey paint and a red leather interior.

miercuri, 10 septembrie 2014

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957 - World Of Classic Cars -

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957

The spectacular Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was in production for just three years, and during this time, only 1,400 cars were built, largely by hand, in Stuttgart’s finest tradition. Yet, despite the low production volume, Daimler-Benz remained sufficiently convinced of the value of an expensive, image-leading sports car as part of its model line-up to develop an improved open version, resolving the well-documented ventilation issue associated with the Gullwing.
A modified 300 SL Roadster chassis was first spotted in the summer of 1956 at Stuttgart, by the German magazine Auto, Motor und Sport.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957

The improved 300 SL Roadster debuted in the spring of 1957 at the Geneva Motor Show. By the end of that year, the final 70 of the 1,400 Gullwing Coupés and the first 618 of the 1,858 300 SL Roadsters were assembled.
Amongst the Roadster’s many advancements was a lowered central section of the lightweight 300 SL space frame chassis, which created improved entrance and egress. The chassis also featured smaller sills and enlarged doors. Whilst strength was maintained, nonetheless, with the addition of diagonal struts that braced the lowered side sections to the rear tubular members. At the rear, the spare tyre was repositioned below the boot floor, necessitating a smaller fuel tank but maintaining reasonable luggage space.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957

The Roadster’s suspension was fine-tuned by the repositioning of the single-pivot rear swing axle and the addition of a coil spring that was mounted transversely above the differential and linked to the two axle halves by a vertical strut, which allowed for the use of softer rear springs, thus providing a more comfortable ride and improved handling. Coupled with fatter tyres and a wider track, the Roadster exhibited none of the prior Coupé’s tricky handling characteristics. This specific feature was borrowed from the W196 Grand Prix racing car.
These revisions added some 250 pounds, with the majority of which being attributed to the convertible top and its mechanisms. The snug-fitting roof retracted fully into a well behind the seats, and it was covered with a hinged panel, which made for a sleek, disappearing top body line. Regardless, the car remained an excellent performer, with a factory-claimed 137 mph top speed.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957

The Roadster shown here was originally delivered in the United States, and it resided in Maryland and California for many years. More recently, it has been exquisitely restored by noted Mercedes-Benz marque specialist Lars Rombelsheim, and it is noteworthy for having an extraordinary number of original major components. The body, engine, and axles are all original and exactly as delivered, with no components replaced, and the car is finished in the same colour combination as original: Black with tan leather upholstery, which is in the correct original grain and pattern.
For everyday driving excellence, the car has been fitted with disc brakes on all four wheels. A modern cooling system with engine pre-heating was installed, along with an electronic ignition and a rear axle rebuilt to the European 3.25:1 ratio, for better high-speed performance. The Roadster still has its original Becker Mexico radio, tool set, and jack, as well as its original manual and service book. European headlamps, one of the most desirable 300 SL Roadster features, were sourced and installed.
Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster 1957

The 300 SL Roadster has gone down in history as one of the finest and most desirable sporting cars of its generation. There are beautifully restored examples, and there are cars that are well-sorted for fast driving by nimble hands that are clad in string-back gloves.

marți, 9 septembrie 2014

Peugeot 908 HDi FAP Le Mans Prototype 2008 - World Of Classic Cars -

Peugeot 908 HDi FAP Le Mans Prototype 2008

Few prototype race cars in recent memory have achieved their mission statement as emphatically as Peugeot’s 908 HDi FAP. The sleek prototype emerged from the manufacturer’s plans to return to endurance racing after a 13-year layoff that followed its two-time Le Mans-winning 905 model of 1992 and 1993. But from its initial conceptual presentation in 2005, it was quite clear that not only was the 908 HDi FAP engineered to win, it was to do so in dramatic, technological fashion, with a cutting-edge, environmentally sound, diesel-powered V-12 that employed an exhaust particulate filter for remarkably clean emissions. Although such a concept seems obligatory in today’s eco-savvy consumer market, this was quite a ground-breaking approach to racing even just 10 years ago.
Peugeot 908 HDi FAP Le Mans Prototype 2008

Following a static introduction at the 2006 Paris Motor Show, the 908 HDi FAP was a winner from the get-go, as it took the chequered flag in its debut at Monza in April 2007. In June, two cars (chassis numbers 02 and 03) were entered at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, with chassis number 03 taking 2nd overall. By the time the season wrapped up at Interlagos in November, the 908 HDi FAP had won the Le Mans Series of endurance racing events. When plans commenced the following year for the 2008 season, the priority on winning at La Sarthe in June was even higher, as it was one of the few season events that the 908 had not won outright.
Peugeot 908 HDi FAP Le Mans Prototype 2008

The monocoque for chassis number 05 was built in late 2007, and it appeared as a complete race car at the 2008 Le Mans for the first official test session on 11 June. It was there in replacement of chassis 04, which was destroyed after a remarkable accident at a Le Mans test day 10 days earlier. Chassis 05 was the only new chassis raced at Le Mans that year alongside the 2007 chassis 02 and 03.
Chassis number 05, decorated with #07 and being driven for Team Peugeot Total by Nicolas Minassian, Marc Gene, and 1997 Formula One champion Jacques Villeneuve, came in 2nd overall, bested only by Audi’s dominant R10 TDI. At the Nürburgring 1000 KM in August, this 908 was again piloted by Gene and Minassian, with the former driver setting the pole time and the latter establishing a fastest lap. There, the car again came in 2nd place, this time following the 1st place finish of chassis number 03. At Silverstone a month later, chassis number 05 was unfortunately forced to retire early, after 45 laps, due to an entanglement with a Porsche GT3 RSR whilst Minassian was behind the wheel.
Peugeot 908 HDi FAP Le Mans Prototype 2008

The following season would prove to be even more significant for this 908, even though it was only raced twice, as two newer chassis had been built that would field a majority of the season’s duties. Starting with the season opener at Sebring in March 2009, chassis number 05, still dressed as #07 and being driven by Christian Klien, Pedro Lamy, and Minassian, placed 5th. In September, changing to #08, the car then took the chequered flag at the Petit Le Mans, with Franck Montagny and Stephane Sarrazin behind the wheel.
In 2010, chassis 05 was entrusted to Oreca to compete in the LMS Championship. At the time, Team Peugeot Total was focusing on the new Intercontinental Le Mans Cup (ILMC). Oreca had started the season racing chassis 02, but it finished the last three races of the season in this chassis 05, finishing 1st overall at the Algarve 1000 KM at Portimao in July, this time wearing #04 and being piloted by Nicolas Lapierre, Olivier Panis, and Sarrazin. Following a disappointing 31st place showing at the Hungaroring 1000 KM in August, which was due to a faulty bevel gear, chassis number 05 bounced back in September 2010 with a 2nd place finish at Silverstone, where it was once again driven by Lapierre and Sarrazin.
Peugeot 908 HDi FAP Le Mans Prototype 2008

This marked the conclusion of the car’s racing career, as the factory withdrew from campaigning the successful 908 HDi FAP following the 2010 season. Without a doubt, chassis number 05 was a strong contributor to the 908’s overall record of victory, as it helped Peugeot win three team championships, three Constructors’ Championships, and two Drivers’ Championships in a span of just four years.
In addition to its outrageous performance on the track, this car also boasts a certain rarity, as it is one of only nine chassis that were actively campaigned by the factory team between 2007 and 2010. Claiming two overall victories, three 2nd place finishes, three pole positions, and four fastest laps, this sensational and technologically innovative piece of racing history represents an important chapter in Peugeot’s considerable competition pedigree.