joi, 22 ianuarie 2015

Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2 Spyder Conversion 1966 - World Of Classic Cars -

Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2 Spyder Conversion 1966

Ferruccio Lamborghini moved from producing tractors and air conditioners to grand touring cars after allegedly having an argument with Enzo Ferrari regarding his own 250 GT, and his automobiles quickly proved to be quite competitive against its intended rival. The marque’s first prototype, the 350 GTV, was unveiled at the Turin Auto Show in November 1963 to great acclaim, and it showed Ferruccio that his vehicles could be successful if they were to be produced. The production 350 GT, which was introduced at Geneva the following year, retained the show car’s design and handedly backed up its stellar looks with exceptional performance. The design was styled by Carrozzeria Touring, of Milan, and it was still elegant, but it was also characteristically different from the vehicles that Pininfarina styled for Ferrari. It boasted a top speed of 150 mph and could easily be capable of crossing large stretches of the autostrada with ease, thanks to exceptional engineering from legendary automotive engineer Giotto Bizzarrini. The car quickly garnered rave reviews from all who drove it, as it combined excellent power, handling, looks, and enough luggage space for a couple for a weekend getaway.
Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2 Spyder Conversion 1966

Nineteen sixty-six brought about the advent of the 400 GT 2+2. The 400 GT 2+2 retained the same style of its predecessor, but virtually every panel had been revised, with the most noticeable change to the exterior being the four headlamps. Inside, engineers created more interior room for passengers by lowering the floor pan and raising the roof, as well as revising both the front and rear suspension. Undoubtedly, the most notable change was that the front-mounted V-12 was enlarged from 3.5 liters to 4.0, raising horsepower to a more than respectable 320. When mated to a five-speed manual gearbox, the powertrain proved tractable enough to be driven in anger or for a leisurely cruise to the coast. Just 247 examples would be produced over two years’ time.
Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2 Spyder Conversion 1966

This 1966 Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2 Spyder, wearing production number 18, was born as a coupe and finished in Grigio Argento over a Nero leather interior. It was delivered to Lambrocar, the official Lamborghini dealer in Milan, Italy, in July 1966, and from there, it was subsequently delivered to its first owner, Dr. Mariano Delle Piane. In the early 1990s, the car was owned by a Peter Wolofsky, of Hallandale, Florida. It is believed that restorer Jerry Fandytis’ work was carried out during Wolofsky’s ownership, making it one of just two 400 GTs converted by him. During the car’s conversion into a spyder, it received a minor restoration, which included the exterior being painted in its current silver-blue metallic, the interior being retrimmed in light grey, and the car being fitted with new wire wheels. After the conversion was completed, Wolofsky later sold it to the Auto Toy Store, of Fort Lauderdale, towards the end of 1993.
Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2 Spyder Conversion 1966

This 400 GT Spyder was purchased by Bob Pond from the Auto Toy Store in May 1994, along with a trio of other Italian cars and one British car, the 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO,1989 Lamborghini Countach, 1971 Lamborghini Miura SV, and 1963 Aston Martin DB4 Convertible.
As the 400 GT was already a wonderful touring car, many believed that all it needed was a convertible top, and if one could have been produced by the factory, it could have been a very successful model. As one of two spyders produced by Fandytis, it goes without saying that this model is exceptionally rare, even within the scope of 400 GT production. In spite of the modification, this Lamborghini certainly retains all of its charm. The interior shows few signs of use, and the silver-blue paint remains in splendid condition. Even though this 400 GT is not as outrageously styled as the marque’s later models, it wild still undoubtedly turn heads wherever it travels.

Aston Martin DBAR1 by Zagato 2003 - World Of Classic Cars -

Aston Martin DBAR1 by Zagato 2003

The decade of the 1990s was an interesting time for Aston Martin. The once profitable, highly fashionable British marque struggled early on, selling only a few dozen automobiles per year. In 1994, it was acquired by Ford, which immediately invested in a new factory in Bloxham to build the all-new DB7. The following year, Aston Martin returned to prosperity by building a record 700 vehicles, and by 2002, the 6,000th DB7 had rolled off the line, eclipsing total production for all previous DB models combined. Aston Martin was back and in better shape than ever.
To celebrate the end of the DB7 production, Aston Martin teamed up with Zagato to create a new car that would recall the vaunted DB4 GT Zagato. The car that resulted, the DBAR1, was introduced at the 2003 Los Angeles Auto Show to great acclaim. Aston Martin also produced DB7 Zagato Coupes, but those were only made available to European and Asian markets. The topless DBAR1, by contrast, was only available for purchase in the North American market, hence the “American Roadster” designation. With Aston Martin’s 48-valve, 6.0-liter V-12 engine under the hood, this Aston’s performance certainly lived up to its looks. With its engine producing 435 horsepower, the DBAR1 can boast a top speed of 185 mph and accelerate from 0 to 60 in 4.9 seconds.
Aston Martin DBAR1 by Zagato 2003

This 2003 DBAR1 was purchased as an untitled car with just delivery mileage by Bob Pond in 2005, and it was used by him sparingly as a warm-weather driver in his collection for trips around town. As a result, the odometer shows just over 600 miles. It is finished in Roadster Green with a Fawn interior, which is perhaps the quintessential DBAR1 color combination, as this is the same color combination that the Los Angeles Auto Show car boasted upon its premiere.
With a design that improved upon the already stunning bodywork of the DB7, the DBAR1 displays many characteristic Zagato cues and is undoubtedly the coachbuilder’s most memorable modern creation. Simply stated, this is a car that checks all the right boxes. With coachwork designed by one of the industry’s most notable design houses, fantastic performance, limited production, and modern amenities, it has it all.

Packard Twelve Coupe Roadster 1933 - World Of Classic Cars -

Packard Twelve Coupe Roadster 1933

The accent on youth was what Packard had in spades in 1933. Yes, the grand automaker was still the choice of American aristocracy, but increasingly, a welcome hint of flash and dash began to find its way into the line. This year’s Tenth Series incorporated classically swept fender lines, but now the fenders were skirted, neatly hiding the mechanical components beneath. A graceful vee’d radiator shell hinted at the power flexed by the top-of-the-line V-12, now in its second season and built on a new tapered frame, and it featured such mechanical refinements as a single dry-plate clutch and automatic choke.
The Twelve Coupe Roadster, built on the 139-inch wheelbase 1005 chassis, was not only youthful, it was downright sporty. It was based upon an earlier LeBaron design and featured trim lines, including a convertible top that would fold completely flat and flush with the body when lowered, hence the evocative “Roadster” name. It is believed that only some 50 examples were produced, beginning with vehicle number 10. The car shown here is number 42, and therefore, it was in all likelihood the 32nd Coupe Roadster built in 1933.
Packard Twelve Coupe Roadster 1933

From Detroit, the new Coupe Roadster traveled across the United States to the largest-volume Packard salesroom in the world, Earle C. Anthony’s palatial dealership in Los Angeles. Anthony had a reputation as a “dealer to the stars,” and indeed, on June 28, 1933, he sold this Coupe Roadster to Paul Pendarvis.
Pendarvis was born in Oklahoma and had achieved considerable fame as a bandleader in Midwestern ballrooms, most prominently at the Congress Hotel in Chicago. He released several popular records, including his signature tune, “My Sweet Heart,” and, of course, “Accent on Youth,” before relocating back to the West Coast and buying his Packard in the mid-1930s. The car’s options included, appropriately enough, an optional Philco-designed Packard key-lock radio!
Packard Twelve Coupe Roadster 1933

Pendarvis retained the Coupe Roadster until 1945, when he sold it to a fellow Californian, Lloyd Langworthy. Two years later, it was passed to Langworthy’s son, Robert, who transferred the title of the car back to his father after entering the military in the early 1950s, but he then took the car back in 1958. Indeed, Robert Langworthy would be this Packard’s longest-term owner, possessing it for some 40 years. He owned it long enough to appreciate it as a fine Classic in the CCCA sense, and in the mid-1970s, he had the car restored in its present brown and beige color combination. The freshly completed Packard was proudly flaunted at the 1976 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it won a class award.
Packard Twelve Coupe Roadster 1933

Mr. Langworthy eventually sold the prized Packard to a well-known California collector and enthusiast, Larry Harvey, who in the early 1990s commissioned Mosier Restoration to completely rebuild the car mechanically. As part of the rebuild, the car was fitted with a high-speed rear end and the engine was rebuilt with a long-stroke crankshaft and other internal improvements, significantly improving the car’s performance and preparing it for the long-distance tours that Mr. Harvey enjoys.
It was undoubtedly the combination of its three-owner provenance, quality restoration, and mechanical fitness that attracted the Coupe Roadster’s fourth owner, legendary Packard enthusiast Thomas Moretti. The late Mr. Moretti restored six Packard Twelves from top to bottom, and each of them won Best in Class at Pebble Beach, which is an enviable and almost unbeatable record of success.
Packard Twelve Coupe Roadster 1933

It is noteworthy that Mr. Moretti purchased this particular Packard not to restore but to drive, indicating that his incredibly high standards were already met when he purchased the car. In his ownership, the Pendarvis Twelve would cover some 20,000 miles, which were racked up one 1,000-mile tour and CARavan at a time.
Yet, the Packard continued to also show well, even as the restoration entered its second decade. In CCCA competition with Mr. Moretti, it eventually garnered 99 points and Premier status. Most poignantly of all, it returned to the lawn at Pebble Beach in 1998.
This lovely Packard, acquired by its present owner from the Moretti Estate, has been maintained to the high standards of its previous caretakers. It is wonderfully redolent of Hollywood in the age of the Brown Derby and the Pan-Pacific Auditorium, venues that this Packard quite likely visited with its original owner at the wheel.

Ferrari 328 GTS 1986 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 328 GTS 1986

Taking much of its design styling from the 308, the 328 exhibits several subtle differences from its predecessor, including body-color bumpers that are integral to the valance panels, a slightly smaller front grille, and a roof spoiler. Pininfarina’s designers also smoothed out the contours of the body’s shape to make it appear slightly less aggressive and more sophisticated.
Inside, Ferrari introduced new and more supportive seats and refined ergonomics, with improved general quality to make the car’s driving experience more intuitive. Mechanically, engine capacity was raised to 3,185 cubic centimeters by increasing the bore and stroke, which helped to bring maximum horsepower to 270 horsepower at 7,000 rpm. The 328 GTS could also reach a top speed of 163 mph and sprint from 0 to 60 in just 5.9 seconds.
Ferrari 328 GTS 1986

The example presented here is undeniably remarkable, as it is in near-new condition, and it is one of those cars that must be seen to be believed. The interior and exterior are nearly flawless, and all of the rubber, carpets, gauges, and ancillary attachments remain excellent throughout.
This outstanding condition is the direct result of the original owner, Mark Neiberg, of Valley Alternator. Neiberg ordered this GTS in late 1986 from Hollywood Sports Cars, and he knew what he wanted: a black-on-black 328 Ferrari. This car also happened to be one of approximately twenty-nine produced in that combination with identical options for that year. From the day he took delivery, the car was kept in his climate-controlled garage in Encino, California. Not only did he take care of how the car was stored, he also drove it only 7,233 miles and had it serviced regularly by the Ferrari dealership.

Lincoln-Zephyr Convertible Sedan 1939 - World Of Classic Cars -

Lincoln-Zephyr Convertible Sedan 1939

Change was in the air in Dearborn for 1939. Along with the Ford and new Mercury cars, the Lincoln-Zephyr received hydraulic brakes, but unlike its siblings’ binders, the Zephyr's brakes had servo-assist. Modest styling changes included a new grille, restyled bumpers, and doors with flanged bottoms, which concealed the running boards. Inside, a central pedestal rose from the floor, containing a radio speaker and heater (when fitted), a clock, and the instrument cluster at the top. The pedestal also concealed the transmission shift lever, which exited at the top on the driver’s side, where it fell easily to hand. The instrument cluster was revised in arrangement, and a voltmeter, which Ford called a “battery condition indicator,” replaced the ammeter. Convertible sedans had new inside door panels and redesigned rear arm rests and seat cushion patterns.
Lincoln-Zephyr Convertible Sedan 1939

The car presented here was one of only three hundred and two convertible sedans produced in 1939. It was acquired by its present owners about a quarter of a century ago, and they immediately began the adventure of restoration. As his wife recalls, the owner had an amazing understanding of the Lincoln-Zephyr and its parts, and he also had an eye for accuracy and detail, insisting that all components be presented as best as possible. Accordingly, no stone was left unturned when returning the car to its original condition.
Stripping the banana yellow paint that the car wore when acquired revealed its original color, the very rare, special shade of Ardmore Green, which was introduced in and available only for 1939. The new finish was applied by a former Hill and Vaughan painter. All colors throughout are original to the car, style, and year, and the car has almost all available options and accessories. When the restoration was completed, it was shown only once, at the Orange County regional meet of the Lincoln-Zephyr Owners Club in 2008, where it scored 98.75 points. There, it was awarded First in Class and the Ford Trophy, and it went on to be displayed at the Petersen Automotive Museum.
This stunningly restored art deco masterpiece of a rare body style in spectacular colors ranks as one of the most popular Lincolns of all time.

Ferrari 550 Barchetta by Pininfarina 2001 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 550 Barchetta by Pininfarina 2001

The introduction of Ferrari’s 550 Maranello signaled a return to the company’s roots in the grandest fashion. Ferrari had been without a two-seat, front-engine V-12 coupe since the Daytona was discontinued in the early 1970s. The decision was made to revive the format as a replacement for their aging mid-engine, flat-twelve models. The result was a major improvement over the outgoing 512M in every way, as it boasted better performance, a larger and more comfortable interior, and a trunk and rear parcel shelf that could easily swallow enough luggage for a week-long road trip for two. Devoted customers, recognizing this return to the golden days of the late 1960s, were quick to place their names for an allocation with their local dealer.
Ferrari 550 Barchetta by Pininfarina 2001

Just as with the Daytona, Ferrari knew that a small number of these clients would be keen to purchase an open version of the new model. The Barchetta was first displayed at the 2000 Paris Motor Show, and it featured a shorter, more aggressively raked windshield, two-piece alloy wheels, an aluminum fuel-filler door, and a restyled trunk that was actually larger than that of the coupe. Additionally, all 550 Barchettas were equipped with racing seats, which were optional in the coupe. Unlike the Daytona Spider of old, the Barchetta was a true roadster, as it was equipped with a soft top substantial enough only for low speed use—Ferrari’s way of enticing their customers to have fun in the sun. Only 448 Barchettas were built, and they have become a “core” model for any Ferrari collection that includes recent vintages.
Ferrari 550 Barchetta by Pininfarina 2001

The car shown here, the 372nd Barchetta constructed, is finished in the classic color combination of Rosso Corsa and Beige leather upholstery. It was delivered new to Ferrari of Long Island in Glen Cove, New York, and was eventually acquired by its present owner, a Canadian enthusiast. Service records on file from Ferrari of Quebec show that the car was fitted with a Tubi exhaust in October 2009, and its timing belts were replaced prior to the service.
Of the modern front-engine Ferrari V-12s, the convertible offerings have always been the most desirable to enthusiasts, and it’s easy to see why. The 550 Barchetta offers even more exclusivity, as it provides its passengers the opportunity to hear it’s V-12 at full song with the wind flowing through their hair. It harkens back to the convertible sports racers of Ferrari’s early days, yet it still offers all the conveniences and luxuries expected in a modern automobile.

miercuri, 7 ianuarie 2015

Ferrari 575 Superamerica by Pininfarina 2005 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ferrari 575 Superamerica by Pininfarina 2005

Ferrari first used the Superamerica name on the 410 model that premiered at the Brussels Salon in 1956. From that point on, the name would be associated with Ferrari’s flagship models, the grandest of tourers that were destined for the carriage houses of captains of industry, A-list celebrities, and various heads of state. Superamericas offered world-beating performance with the highest available degree of luxury, and they became renowned as amongst the most desirable automobiles that money could buy. The final 400 Superamerica was produced in 1964, and with it, the Superamerica name ceased in usage for over four decades. It was a legendary moniker that was considered the ultimate by tifosi.
Ferrari 575 Superamerica by Pininfarina 2005

In 2005, the fabled name returned on a limited-edition convertible variant of the 575M Maranello that had been beautifully drawn by Pininfarina with lines that perfectly complemented the personality of the car. Rather than fitting the Superamerica with a conventional folding soft top, Ferrari chose a special “Revocromico” roof, which was crafted of electrochromatic glass and carbon fiber. With the push of a button, the roof would rotate away in less than 10 seconds, opening the interior to the air, with the rear window remaining in place to function as a wind deflector. If the weather was not favorable, the level of tint in the glass could be adjusted to allow the full brightness of a conventional sunroof, with as little as 1% of available sunlight, into the cabin. Unlike most retractable hardtops, the 575 Superamerica’s roof panel rested on the rear deck when in the open position, leaving plenty of room for a week’s luggage in the trunk.
Ferrari 575 Superamerica by Pininfarina 2005

This particular Superamerica is a very early production example, and it is believed to be only the second Superamerica built. Interestingly, according to documentation supplied by Ferrari in its Classiche certification binder, the car was not delivered new to a dealership, but rather to Ferrari’s North American headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, perhaps for press and promotional purposes.
The Superamerica certainly carries all the pomp and circumstance embodied in its predecessors, as it is a limited-production model that is versatile enough to be used on a daily basis. Its unique rotating hardtop provides its passengers the opportunity to enjoy the sunlight with the roof closed and further access can be granted with just the flick of a switch.

marți, 6 ianuarie 2015

Nissan Skyline C10 Series - World Of Classic Cars - Rank 184

Nissan Skyline H/T 2000GT-R 'Hakosuka' 1972

The C10 series of 1968, which began its development under Prince at the company's Ogikubo R&D centre in the suburbs of Tokyo, was marketed with a Nissan badge. By the time the C10 went on sale, the Prince nameplate had been completely phased out on cars and trucks. The dealer network selling the cars became the Prince channel of Nissan, and the marketing group stayed at the Prince headquarters in Mita instead of moving to Nissan's headquarters in Ginza. The C10 Skyline was launched with Prince's 1.5 L OHC G15 I4 like the S57. A 1.8 L G18 version was also available. A station wagon variant, known previously as the Prince Skyway, was offered with this generation. A hardtop coupé was introduced in October 1970.
The brake- and tail-lights were modified to square units, but now included dual units for both the left and right side of the vehicle. As the Skyline was now a Nissan product, it was repositioned above the Bluebird as a more sport-oriented sedan and coupe, while the Bluebird remained more economical.

2000GT-X
Nissan Skyline H/T 2000GT-R 'Hakosuka' 1972

In 1971, the KGC10 2000 GT-X received a 2.0 L (1,998 cc) L20 straight-six engine instead of the Prince G-7 engine. The chassis was already designed to fit a straight six, to avoid the S54 extension problem. 120 PS (88 kW) was available from this new engine. In March 1972 expanded the lineup to include a four-door GT-X sedan.

2000GT

The following year, the GC10 2000GT received a 2.0 L (1998 cc) L20 I6 engine like the Nissan Cedric instead of a Prince G-7 engine. The chassis was already designed to receive a straight six, to avoid the S54 extension problem. 105 hp (78 kW) was available from this new engine, in 1970 Nissan production Skyline 2000GT Automatic, in October 1970 Nissan introduced 2 Door Coupe.

GT-R
Nissan Skyline H/T 2000GT-R 'Hakosuka' 1972

The first GT-R Skyline appeared in February 1969.[12] Called the PGC-10 (KPGC-10 for later coupé version) internally and Hakosuka (ハコスカ) by fans. Hako (ハコ) means Box in Japanese, and suka(スカ) is short for Skyline (スカイライン; Sukairain). It used the 2.0 L (1998 cc) S20 I6. This new DOHC engine (which was designed by the former Prince engineers) produced 160 hp (118 kW, 180 N m), and was similar to the GR8 engine used in the Prince R380 racing car.
The GT-R began as a sedan, but a 2-door coupé version was debuted in October 1970 and introduced in March 1971. The cars were stripped of unnecessary equipment to be as light as possible for racing, and performed well at the track. The sedan racked up 33 victories in less than two years, and the coupé stretched this to 50 through 1972.
The C10 raced against many cars including the Toyota Corona 1600GT (RT55), Isuzu Bellett GTR, Mazda Familia (R100) & Capella (RX-2) – even Porsche. In late 1971 the new Mazda RX-3 became the GT-R's main rival. The GT-R managed a few more victories before the RX-3 ended the GT-R's winning streak.

Shelby Mustang GT350 H 1966 - World Of Classic Cars -

Shelby Mustang GT350 H 1966

In 1966, Carroll Shelby, as shrewd a business man as he was a racer, struck a deal with Hertz to offer a high-performance rental car to the public for the first time. This made the legendary performance of the Shelby GT350 accessible to the general public. The GT350 had been around for just a year, but it had already gained an excellent reputation both on the street and on race tracks across the country.
Enthusiasts that might not have been able to afford such a car could now rent it on a Friday afternoon and drop it off at Hertz on Monday morning, after a weekend full of racing or high-speed cruising. The cost to rent all this performance was just $17 a day and 17 cents per mile. One thousand GT350s, with the majority finished in Hertz’s colors of black and gold, were delivered to the company for use around the country in 1966.
Shelby Mustang GT350 H 1966

This specific GT350 H wears serial number 1822 and was delivered new to Hertz in Chicago, Illinois, with a total invoice price of $3,757.25. According to the SAAC Shelby Registry, it featured a radio and chrome Magnum wheels. After concluding its career at Hertz in Chicago, it was purchased by Robert Layman, of Michigan, and subsequently travelled to Florida, where it was owned by James J. Cali, of Dania, and then Todd Clements, of West Palm Beach.
The car was then purchased and later fully restored to original specifications by noted Texas collector Don Davis. In May 2010, Davis sold the car to none other than Carroll Shelby to be part of his personal collection, as it was an outstanding example of one of the best cars to bear his name. Shortly before his passing, the car was purchased by a renowned collector on the East Coast, who owns it to this day. The GT350 H remains in excellent condition following its restoration, and it still retains the title from Carroll Shelby’s ownership.

Mercedes-Benz 190 SL Roadster 1960 - World Of Classic Cars -

Mercedes-Benz 190 SL Roadster 1960

The Mercedes-Benz 190SL was the vision of Max Hoffman, Mercedes’ representative in the United States. Hoffman understood that while the 300SL Gullwing Coupe might certainly catch American buyers’ attention, it had two drawbacks; first, it was a coupe, and second, it was very expensive. Knowing that the American market was ideally suited for convertibles, Hoffman pressured Mercedes-Benz management to build a simpler, less costly open model for the U.S. market, and the result was the Mercedes-Benz 190SL.
The 190SL incorporated many advanced engineering features and was powered by a single overhead-camshaft, four-cylinder engine. As the 190SL was equipped with four-wheel drum brakes, conventional doors, and a simple swing-axle rear suspension, it was best suited for stylish cruising rather than performance driving. Max Hoffman’s understanding of the American car market was right on target, and more than 26,000 190SL Roadsters were produced between 1955 and 1963.
Mercedes-Benz 190 SL Roadster 1960

The 190 SL Roadster shown here is an example of the most iconic of open Mercedes-Benzes. While in previous enthusiast ownership, it was restored in its current light blue with a dark blue leather interior, and it has been fitted with whitewall radial tires, matching wheel covers, and a navy convertible top. Among the Roadster’s many desirable features are a Blaupunkt radio, an original speaker box, and a VDO clock mounted on the glove box door, as well as front and rear over-riders.