vineri, 17 aprilie 2015

Wartburg 312 1965 For Sale - World Of Classic Cars -

Wartburg 312 1965
Wartburg 312 for sale. Year: 1965 Mileage: 900.000 km Engine capacity: 993 cm3 Price: 3.800 Euros



For informations:
worldofclassiccars@gmail.com

Rolls Royce Silver Shadow 1974 For Sale - World Of Classic Cars -

Rolls Royce Silver Shadow 1974
Rolls Royce Silver Shadow for sale. Year: 1974 Mileage: 100.000 km Engine capacity: 6.750 cm Price: 11.500 Euros



For informations:
worldofclassiccars@gamil.com

Dacia 1100 1969 For Sale - World Of Classic Cars -

Dacia 1100 1969
Dacia 1100 for sale. Year: 1969 Mileage: 84.000 km Engine capacity: 1.108 cm3 Price 2000 Euros


For informations:
worldofclassiccars@gmail.com

Dacia 1100 1969 For Sale - World Of Classic Cars -

Dacia 1100 1969
Dacia 1100 for sale. Year: 1969 Mileage: 100.000 km Engine: 1.108 cm3 Price: 1900 Euros


For informations:
worldofclassiccars@gmail.com

Ford Hauler 1942 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ford Hauler 1942

GMC Military Truck - World Of Classic Cars -

GMC Military Truck

marți, 14 aprilie 2015

Regal Model N 'Underslung' Roadster 1913 - World Of Classic Cars -

Regal Model N 'Underslung' Roadster 1913

The design of the underslung chassis—on which the frame is suspended from the axles rather than vice versa—is credited to Fred Tone, the chief engineer of the American Motor Car Company of Indianapolis. Indeed, the design became so linked to that company that its cars are usually referred to as “American Underslung,” despite the fact that American never badged them thus, nor were all Americans underslung. Moreover, this early “American Motors” was not the sole purveyor of underslung suspension, which also hides under a number of other automobiles, including the rear of most Morgan sports cars.
The appeal of the underslung recipe was that it lowered the car’s center of gravity while also preserved ground clearance. A downside was the need for larger wheels in order to maintain that clearance. It was responsible for very good handling, to the point that many consider the American underslungs to be the first American sports cars.
Regal Model N 'Underslung' Roadster 1913

The second most-prominent maker of underslung cars in the United States was the Regal Motor Car Company, of Detroit, Michigan. This company begun as a partnership between brothers Charles and Bert Lambert and Fred Haines, and they started building cars, which were conventionally constructed for the mid-price market, in 1908. They were quite successful. The first underslung models came late in 1910, in the smaller 20-horsepower line. The model was designated the Model N, and they were initially made as runabouts, but touring and coupe models were added in later years. The coupe, called the “Colonial Coupe,” looked the part, as its tall, paned windows resembled a dwelling.
Regal Model N 'Underslung' Roadster 1913

This Model N Regal Underslung Roadster has a fascinating history. It was acquired by The Edison Institute of Dearborn, Michigan, in 1930 from a Mr. J. Crook, of Detroit. The Edison Institute, better known for many years as the Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Village, is now called simply The Henry Ford. The car was on display there until 1979, at which time it was put into storage. During that period, maintenance consisted of conservation of the vehicle and limited cosmetic freshening to keep it suitable for display.
In the early 1980s, it was de-accessioned and sold to a Texas collector, who kept it for nearly 30 years. It was subsequently in the collection of Robert Pass before being purchased more recently by the current owner. This car is possibly the most original Regal Underslung extant, and it has recently been re-commissioned by noted specialist Chris Kidd at his Tired Iron Works in Monrovia, California. Notably, the car features new seat upholstery in black buttoned leather, while other aspects have been freshened with respect to originality. The paint presents quite well, despite dating back to a detailing by the Ford Museum in the early 1970s, according to records. On the dashboard, a brass plaque gives careful instructions for starting, and the brass Stewart speedometer is unusual for having a gradometer in addition to the requisite speed and distance measurements. The engine required just a cleaning and tune-up.
Regal Model N 'Underslung' Roadster 1913

The Regal Model N Roadster, best described as “jaunty,” is smaller than the iconic underslung American and less imposing than a Stutz Bearcat or Mercer Raceabout, but it is every bit as much fun.

Chrysler Royal Town and Country Six-Passenger 'Barrelback' Station Wagon 1941 - World Of Classic Cars -

Chrysler Royal Town and Country Six-Passenger 'Barrelback' Station Wagon 1941

In 1941, Chrysler introduced a unique wood-bodied car to the six-cylinder Windsor line. It was neither sedan nor pure station wagon, as it had a fastback profile with twin hinged doors at the rear. In contrast to most wood-bodied utility vehicles, the new Town and Country car, as the company initially called it, had lavishly varnished wood inside and quality upholstery. The name reportedly came from the design of the car, which was “town” (metal) in front and “country” (wood) in back.
Chrysler Royal Town and Country Six-Passenger 'Barrelback' Station Wagon 1941

This first edition of the Town and Country has become known as the “Barrelback,” from its rounded rear styling combining with “clamshell” rear doors. The doors lead to a large and useful storage area behind the rear passenger seats. A nine-passenger version was also offered, with a limousine-type folding bench seat between the two rows of standard seats.
Exactly 996 were built, with approximately 200 of them in six-passenger configuration and the rest as nine-seaters with rear quarter windows. In addition, a single prototype was built on an eight-cylinder chassis. While restored 1941 Town and Countrys are occasionally seen at concours d’elegance, they are almost always the nine-passenger model. Only twenty-two 1941 Town and Countrys are known and only four of these are the six-passenger model; as a result, they are very seldom offered for public sale.
Chrysler Royal Town and Country Six-Passenger 'Barrelback' Station Wagon 1941

This stunning car is believed to be the only six-passenger 1941 Town and Country with factory “blind rear quarters” of the four remaining.
The car shown here is a rare, wonderful exception, having benefited from an outstanding restoration, which was completed around 2006. Its body wood is described as “near-perfect” with a splendid, deep sheen, thanks to the exquisite wood work of Glazier Coach & Pattern Works, of Houston, Ohio. The chassis has been authentically restored to factory standards, and very importantly, the dashboard, including the steering wheel, has correct, mostly NOS red “modeled” plastic. The car has remained for many years in the important private collection of one of the country’s foremost Town and Country enthusiasts, where it has been painstakingly well-maintained.
Chrysler Royal Town and Country Six-Passenger 'Barrelback' Station Wagon 1941

Mechanically, it was fully restored, with a recent re-fresh by Harms Distinctive Restorations, who specialize in the Chrysler Town and Country series. It is described by its caretaker as “running as well as any one you will ever find, and it really drives nice. It looks great; it really does.”

luni, 13 aprilie 2015

Mercedes-Benz 190SL - World Of Classic Cars -

Mercedes-Benz 190SL 1957

The Mercedes-Benz 190SL made history at the New York International Motor Sports Show in February 1954 by being the first new production Mercedes- Benz to be unveiled outside of Germany. The impression given by the 190SL, alongside the bigger 300SL, was neat, sporty and with dashing lines. This was the trait of Mercedes-Benz designers Karl Wilfret and Walter Hacket. Despite opinions, the statistics tell their own tale as between May 1955 and February 1963, 25,881 of these cars were produced - it was a huge success for Mercedes-Benz. Its engine boasted four inline cylinders with a chain driven overhead camshaft and two Solex 44PHH carburettors delivering a respectable 108bhp for that era. The body was a monocoque design, welded to the shortened chassis of the type 180 saloon. A racing version with aluminium doors and a small windscreen was never produced although these parts could be ordered from the Factory for weekend racing.

Maserati Bi-Turbo - World Of Classic Cars -

Maserati Bi-Turbo Spyder 1983

When Alejandro de Tomaso acquired Maserati in 1976, he had ambitious plans for the marque. His plan was to combine the prestige of the Maserati brand with a sports car that would be more affordable than the earlier high-priced models that had traditionally made up the Maserati range.
The Maserati Bi-turbo  features, as the name implies, a two-litre V6 engine with two turbochargers and a luxurious interior. The car was designed by Pierangelo Andreani, an engineer from the De Tomaso team, somewhat influenced by the design of the newer Quattroporte III (Italdesign Giugiaro), as can be observed on the front fascia.'
Maserati Bi-Turbo Spyder 1983

The Bi-turbo was initially a strong seller and brought Italian prestige to a wide audience and competed (unsuccessfully) in the British Touring Car Championship in the late 1980's, the European Touring Car Championship and the 1987 World Touring Car Championship.
The Spyder version was introduced at the Turin Motor Show in 1984 and was designed and built by the world class designers, Zagato. Overall 3,076 were built over a ten-year period, setting a production record for Maserati Spyders.