miercuri, 23 martie 2016

Ford Super DeLuxe Sportsman Convertible 1947 - World Of Classic Cars -

Ford Super DeLuxe Sportsman Convertible 1947

Ford’s most interesting models often evolved from special cars built for “the family.” There was the Lincoln Continental, of course, which was born from a one-off custom built for Edsel Ford to drive in Florida. Then there was a certain wood-bodied Model A Roadster, which was used by Henry Ford II to drive to the beach on Long Island. After World War II, “Hank the Deuce” had Bob Gregorie draw up a 1946 version of the wood-bodied car with the help of his head illustrator, Ross Cousins. A wood-bodied convertible would be just the thing to pull customers away from those pesky Plymouth and Chevrolet dealers; while few would be sold, their ability to get customers in the door would be priceless. Thus, the Sportsman was born.
Ford Super DeLuxe Sportsman Convertible 1947

Sportsmans were built at Ford’s Iron Mountain body plant in Michigan, using standard convertible bodies that were fitted with sedan delivery fenders and taillights. The bodies were beautifully built and crafted of the finest maple, birch, and mahogany, with each maple piece carved from solid wood. The seats were upholstered in genuine leather facings in tan or red and included French stitching. The front floor mats had color-keyed carpet inserts, and power windows were standard.
The Sportsman retailed for about $500 more than a standard Super DeLuxe Convertible, and it lasted for two years, with a handful of leftovers being retitled and sold in 1948. It was, in the end, the Ford GT of its time. As the company had planned, it was never a volume seller, but it was the brightest of halo cars, drawing customers into showrooms and serving as an example of the best that the company could produce.
Ford Super DeLuxe Sportsman Convertible 1947

One of 2,274 Sportsmans built in the 1947 model year, the car shown here has been meticulously cared for in the consigner’s collection for the past seven years. An older show-quality restoration, it has been recently freshened with a bare-metal repaint in Glade Green, handsomely complemented by a tan power-operated convertible top, excellent brightwork, and many desirable options and accessories, including front and rear bumper guards, period-correct fog lights, dual chrome-plated rearview mirrors, and a set of wide whitewall tires, mounted on black steel wheels adorned with chrome-plated trim rings and hubcaps. The impressive Art Deco–inspired interior was recently fitted with new correct-type red leather upholstery and is equipped with a heater, clock, and radio. The wood trim is original and remains in excellent condition throughout. Interestingly, all Sportsmans were equipped with hydraulic window lifts, quite a luxury in 1947. Meanwhile, the engine bay, featuring the legendary Ford “flathead” V-8 engine, is thoroughly detailed.